Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184356
Title:
Factors affecting selectivity of covalent chromatography.
Author:
Crampton, Mary Catherine.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Of the interactions utilized in the separation of chemical species, the reversible covalent bond is the strongest and most selective. In order to exploit the selectivity of this interaction, an understanding of the effects of several factors on the formation of the covalent bond have been studied. Covalent chromatography is most useful in solid phase extraction. The strength of the covalent bond will allow for high distribution coefficients needed to quantitatively retain chemical species. The selectivity of the covalent interaction allows for the retention of a specific compound or class of compounds. Under conditions where the covalent bond is no longer formed or will break, a low distribution coefficient is possible, and the compounds may be eluted from the sorbent in a small volume allowing for preconcentration. The sorbent consists of three parts, the active functionality capable of forming reversible covalent bonds, the solid support and the spacer arm that tethers the active functionality to the support. Silica supports demonstrate several advantages over organic supports. However, silica supports have been limited by the activity of the residual silanols and the use of hydrophobic spacer arms. This research describes the preparation and characterization of a modification method for silica with a hydrophilic spacer arm that restricts the sample from the residual silanols. Immobilized phenylboronic acid (PBA) interacts with compounds containing polar functionalities in the correct configuration, but this interaction is dependent on the local environment. Controlling the local environment allows for the control of the interaction provided the effects are understood. Diagnostic chromatography was used to determine the effects of the solvent strength, ionic strength, pH and composition of the mobile phase and the effects of the spacer arm on the interactions of PBA with several compounds. Three phases selective for thiols were also characterized. Thiopyridone attached to mercaptopropyl bonded silica through a disulfide linkage, is used for isolation and detection. Immobilized phenylmercury was utilized for the extraction of thiol containing species while immobilized phenylarsonous acid selectively extracts dithiol compounds. A unique and powerful means of separation of monothiol from dithiol compounds has been demonstrated.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chemical bonds.; Chromatographic analysis.; Separation (Technology)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemistry; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burke, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFactors affecting selectivity of covalent chromatography.en_US
dc.creatorCrampton, Mary Catherine.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCrampton, Mary Catherine.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOf the interactions utilized in the separation of chemical species, the reversible covalent bond is the strongest and most selective. In order to exploit the selectivity of this interaction, an understanding of the effects of several factors on the formation of the covalent bond have been studied. Covalent chromatography is most useful in solid phase extraction. The strength of the covalent bond will allow for high distribution coefficients needed to quantitatively retain chemical species. The selectivity of the covalent interaction allows for the retention of a specific compound or class of compounds. Under conditions where the covalent bond is no longer formed or will break, a low distribution coefficient is possible, and the compounds may be eluted from the sorbent in a small volume allowing for preconcentration. The sorbent consists of three parts, the active functionality capable of forming reversible covalent bonds, the solid support and the spacer arm that tethers the active functionality to the support. Silica supports demonstrate several advantages over organic supports. However, silica supports have been limited by the activity of the residual silanols and the use of hydrophobic spacer arms. This research describes the preparation and characterization of a modification method for silica with a hydrophilic spacer arm that restricts the sample from the residual silanols. Immobilized phenylboronic acid (PBA) interacts with compounds containing polar functionalities in the correct configuration, but this interaction is dependent on the local environment. Controlling the local environment allows for the control of the interaction provided the effects are understood. Diagnostic chromatography was used to determine the effects of the solvent strength, ionic strength, pH and composition of the mobile phase and the effects of the spacer arm on the interactions of PBA with several compounds. Three phases selective for thiols were also characterized. Thiopyridone attached to mercaptopropyl bonded silica through a disulfide linkage, is used for isolation and detection. Immobilized phenylmercury was utilized for the extraction of thiol containing species while immobilized phenylarsonous acid selectively extracts dithiol compounds. A unique and powerful means of separation of monothiol from dithiol compounds has been demonstrated.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChemical bonds.en_US
dc.subjectChromatographic analysis.en_US
dc.subjectSeparation (Technology)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurke, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPemberton, Jeanneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFernando, Quintusen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSalzman, W. Ronalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarfield, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8814226en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701239253en_US
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