The predictors of non-prejudicial attitudes in secondary school students.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184342
Title:
The predictors of non-prejudicial attitudes in secondary school students.
Author:
Brascugli, Mary Miller.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research has identified personal attributions which appear to correlate with non-prejudicial attitudes. The Defense of Prejudice theory identifies these attributes as a View of Self, a View of Others, a View of Society, and Logical Reasoning. This study sought to confirm the theory as valid and to identify those sub-scales within the defenses which might be stronger predictors than others in the identification of non-prejudicial attitudes. The subjects selected for the study were four secondary schools in northern and central Minnesota with differing school populations. The relationships between lack of prejudice were identified with correlation coefficients, multiple regression and mean scores. Analysis of the data confirmed all four areas of defense are valid predictors of non-prejudicial attitudes. Although there is a difference in the strength of the relationships between each defense scale and prejudice, the patterns are consistent for each grade and gender. The individual sub-scales are consistent in strength, using both correlations and multiple regression. Females were consistently less prejudiced than males, and prejudicial attitudes lessened as age increased. Overall, there was a pattern of decrease in prejudice from grade seven to grade twelve, although not a consistent linear rise. The pattern was consistent for males and females in each school. Empathy was generally the overall strongest predictor of non-prejudicial attitudes in all schools, for all grades, and for both males and females. Since one sub-scale from each area of defense was consistently one of the four sub-scales with the most strength in predicting prejudicial attitudes, it was determined the analysis could be employed with valid and reliable results using one sub-scale for each area of defense. If we are able to influence empathy, logic, anomie, and self-concept, then we should be able to decrease prejudicial attitudes among students.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pate, Glenn S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe predictors of non-prejudicial attitudes in secondary school students.en_US
dc.creatorBrascugli, Mary Miller.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrascugli, Mary Miller.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch has identified personal attributions which appear to correlate with non-prejudicial attitudes. The Defense of Prejudice theory identifies these attributes as a View of Self, a View of Others, a View of Society, and Logical Reasoning. This study sought to confirm the theory as valid and to identify those sub-scales within the defenses which might be stronger predictors than others in the identification of non-prejudicial attitudes. The subjects selected for the study were four secondary schools in northern and central Minnesota with differing school populations. The relationships between lack of prejudice were identified with correlation coefficients, multiple regression and mean scores. Analysis of the data confirmed all four areas of defense are valid predictors of non-prejudicial attitudes. Although there is a difference in the strength of the relationships between each defense scale and prejudice, the patterns are consistent for each grade and gender. The individual sub-scales are consistent in strength, using both correlations and multiple regression. Females were consistently less prejudiced than males, and prejudicial attitudes lessened as age increased. Overall, there was a pattern of decrease in prejudice from grade seven to grade twelve, although not a consistent linear rise. The pattern was consistent for males and females in each school. Empathy was generally the overall strongest predictor of non-prejudicial attitudes in all schools, for all grades, and for both males and females. Since one sub-scale from each area of defense was consistently one of the four sub-scales with the most strength in predicting prejudicial attitudes, it was determined the analysis could be employed with valid and reliable results using one sub-scale for each area of defense. If we are able to influence empathy, logic, anomie, and self-concept, then we should be able to decrease prejudicial attitudes among students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPate, Glenn S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobinson, David P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8814213en_US
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