The ethnobotany and phenology of plants in and adjacent to two riparian habitats in southeastern Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184332
Title:
The ethnobotany and phenology of plants in and adjacent to two riparian habitats in southeastern Arizona.
Author:
Adams, Karen Rogers.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two riparian habitats in southeastern Arizona provide the setting for a study of 127 plants useful to human foragers. A view of plant part availability is based on annual phenological profiles, and on historic and prehistoric records of plant use. Food choice is limited in March and April, but high August through November. Riparian plants also offer numerous non-food resources. Trees and shrubs serve more needs in relation to number of available species than do perennial herbs (including grasses) and annuals. Southwestern ethnographic literature hints that certain native taxa (Panicum, Physalis, Populus, Salix, Typha and Vitis) might receive special care. Inherent qualities of parts, coupled with ethnographic records of preparation and use, provide a basis for speculation on which parts might survive in an ancient record. Most are expected to disintegrate in open sites. Parts sought for different needs can enter a dwelling via diverse routes that produce confusingly similar archaeological debris. Modern experiments to wash pollen from 14 separate harvests permit evaluation of plant fruit and leaves as pollen traps, to help interpret pollen recovered from ancient dwellings. High amounts of Berberis, Rumex and Ribes pollen, sometimes in clumps or as tetrads, travel on harvested fruit. Arctostaphylos, Monarda, Oxalis, Rhus, Rhamnus, Vitis and Juniperus parts carry lower amounts. Quercus and Gramineae pollen grains travel on parts of other taxa, as well as on their own fruit. The phenological profiles offer insight into group life-form activities in response to local temperature and precipitation trends. Rising and maximum temperatures coincide with intense vegetative and reproductive activity for trees, shrubs, herbaceous perennials, and annuals. Increased levels of precipitation coincide with maximum flowering and fruiting of herbaceous perennials and fall annuals. Limited data on six taxa from Utah generally agrees with observations in this study, suggesting strong genetic control in the phenology of some riparian taxa.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Ethnobotany -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.; Ethnobotany -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.; Riparian plants.; Paleobotany -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.; Paleobotany -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.; Riparian ecology -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.; Riparian ecology -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.; Plant phenology -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.; Plant phenology -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.; Palynology -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.; Palynology -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Asdall, Willard Van

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe ethnobotany and phenology of plants in and adjacent to two riparian habitats in southeastern Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorAdams, Karen Rogers.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Karen Rogers.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo riparian habitats in southeastern Arizona provide the setting for a study of 127 plants useful to human foragers. A view of plant part availability is based on annual phenological profiles, and on historic and prehistoric records of plant use. Food choice is limited in March and April, but high August through November. Riparian plants also offer numerous non-food resources. Trees and shrubs serve more needs in relation to number of available species than do perennial herbs (including grasses) and annuals. Southwestern ethnographic literature hints that certain native taxa (Panicum, Physalis, Populus, Salix, Typha and Vitis) might receive special care. Inherent qualities of parts, coupled with ethnographic records of preparation and use, provide a basis for speculation on which parts might survive in an ancient record. Most are expected to disintegrate in open sites. Parts sought for different needs can enter a dwelling via diverse routes that produce confusingly similar archaeological debris. Modern experiments to wash pollen from 14 separate harvests permit evaluation of plant fruit and leaves as pollen traps, to help interpret pollen recovered from ancient dwellings. High amounts of Berberis, Rumex and Ribes pollen, sometimes in clumps or as tetrads, travel on harvested fruit. Arctostaphylos, Monarda, Oxalis, Rhus, Rhamnus, Vitis and Juniperus parts carry lower amounts. Quercus and Gramineae pollen grains travel on parts of other taxa, as well as on their own fruit. The phenological profiles offer insight into group life-form activities in response to local temperature and precipitation trends. Rising and maximum temperatures coincide with intense vegetative and reproductive activity for trees, shrubs, herbaceous perennials, and annuals. Increased levels of precipitation coincide with maximum flowering and fruiting of herbaceous perennials and fall annuals. Limited data on six taxa from Utah generally agrees with observations in this study, suggesting strong genetic control in the phenology of some riparian taxa.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEthnobotany -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.en_US
dc.subjectEthnobotany -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.en_US
dc.subjectRiparian plants.en_US
dc.subjectPaleobotany -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.en_US
dc.subjectPaleobotany -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.en_US
dc.subjectRiparian ecology -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.en_US
dc.subjectRiparian ecology -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.en_US
dc.subjectPlant phenology -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.en_US
dc.subjectPlant phenology -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.en_US
dc.subjectPalynology -- Arizona -- Ramsey Canyon.en_US
dc.subjectPalynology -- Arizona -- Canelo Hills.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAsdall, Willard Vanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMason, Charles T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartin, Paul S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Owen K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTurner, Raymond M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8814204en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701107064en_US
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