Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184286
Title:
Increasing the propensity to use computer application software.
Author:
Yellen, Richard Emerson.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of computer application software could be increased. The goal of this research was to uncover a design for a module which instructs the potential user how to use software. This type of module, called an instructional module, would, when incorporated on software such as decision support tools, increase the willingness of novices to use the software more frequently. Four instructional modules designs, which were the result of combining two states of two variables of instructional module design, were examined. The four designs are (1) an automated programmed learning module; (2) an automated help facility; (3) a manual programmed learning module and; (4) a manual help facility. A financial decision support tool was developed, and each of the four instructional modules designs was placed separately on the decision support tool. This created, in effect, four different tools. Subjects in the experiment were business school students with no formal experience using a decision support tool. Each subject was exposed to two of the four instructional module designs during a training session which lasted one hour. One month after the training session, the subjects were reassembled for a second session. During this session, the subjects selected one of the two tools, with its instructional module, which they had been exposed to previously. The subjects were to use the selected tool to solve problems which would likely require them to access the instructional module. In addition to these behavioral selection data, attitudinal data concerning the instructional module designs were also collected throughout both sessions of the experiment. Based on their selection and their attitudinal responses, the subjects indicated that the tool with the automated programmed learning module was the module of choice. The research methodology successfully provided input for instructional module design for computer application software such as decision support tools.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Computer-assisted instruction -- Computer programs.; Instructional systems -- Design.; Programmed instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIncreasing the propensity to use computer application software.en_US
dc.creatorYellen, Richard Emerson.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYellen, Richard Emerson.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of computer application software could be increased. The goal of this research was to uncover a design for a module which instructs the potential user how to use software. This type of module, called an instructional module, would, when incorporated on software such as decision support tools, increase the willingness of novices to use the software more frequently. Four instructional modules designs, which were the result of combining two states of two variables of instructional module design, were examined. The four designs are (1) an automated programmed learning module; (2) an automated help facility; (3) a manual programmed learning module and; (4) a manual help facility. A financial decision support tool was developed, and each of the four instructional modules designs was placed separately on the decision support tool. This created, in effect, four different tools. Subjects in the experiment were business school students with no formal experience using a decision support tool. Each subject was exposed to two of the four instructional module designs during a training session which lasted one hour. One month after the training session, the subjects were reassembled for a second session. During this session, the subjects selected one of the two tools, with its instructional module, which they had been exposed to previously. The subjects were to use the selected tool to solve problems which would likely require them to access the instructional module. In addition to these behavioral selection data, attitudinal data concerning the instructional module designs were also collected throughout both sessions of the experiment. Based on their selection and their attitudinal responses, the subjects indicated that the tool with the automated programmed learning module was the module of choice. The research methodology successfully provided input for instructional module design for computer application software such as decision support tools.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectComputer-assisted instruction -- Computer programs.en_US
dc.subjectInstructional systems -- Design.en_US
dc.subjectProgrammed instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNunamaker, Jayen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNorthcraft, Gregen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLogan, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGeorge, Joeyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeber, Sueen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8804194en_US
dc.identifier.oclc700054045en_US
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