Influence of protein level and degradability on performance of lactating cows during hot and cool environmental temperatures.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184265
Title:
Influence of protein level and degradability on performance of lactating cows during hot and cool environmental temperatures.
Author:
Higginbotham, Gerald Ernest.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One hundred and twenty lactating Holstein cows in mid-lactation were offered diets varying in protein level and degradability at two locations during hot and moderate weather. Treatments were: (1) High protein (19%), high degradability (65%); (2) High protein (19%), medium degradability (40%); (3) Medium protein (15.5%), high degradability (65%); (4) Medium protein (15.5%), medium degradability (40%). Diets were individually fed during hot weather at the University of Arizona Dairy Farm and contained 38.4% alfalfa hay, 12.4% cottonseed hulls, 9.8% whole cottonseed, and 39.4% concentrate (dry matter). Diets were group fed during moderate weather at the Brigham Young University Dairy Farm, Provo, Ut, and contained 31.3% corn silage, 14% alfalfa haylage, 9.4% whole cottonseed and 45.3% concentrate (dry matter). Average daily ambient temperatures were 35.1°C for hot and 26.8°C for moderate weather locations. Fat-corrected milk (3.5%, 2 x milkings) and milk persistency were lower for treatment 1 than other treatments. For the respective treatments during hot weather means were: 23.4, 26.6, 28.5, 28.4 kg/d; 83.2, 91.2, 90.9, 90.3%; and for moderate weather means were: (3 x milkings): 34.7, 31.8, 32.2, 32.4 kg/d; 97.0, 93.4, 92.1, 90.3%. Dry matter intakes during hot weather were 21.5, 21.9, 23.3, and 23.1 kg/d. Respiration rate and rectal temperature during hot weather were: 90.1, 87.9, 90.9, 94.7 counts/min; 39.0, 39.3, 39.3, 39.5°C and for moderate weather: 61.2, 58.2, 55.5, 67.4 counts/min; 38.8, 38.6, 38.7, 38.8°C. Serum T₃,T₄ and cortisol were generally unaffected by treatment, but were depressed during hot weather. Serum glucose was not significantly affected by treatments at either environmental locations. Animals consumed more water with highly degradable protein diets at each location along with consuming more water during thermal stress. These data show that 3.5% fat-corrected milk and milk persistency are significantly affected (P <.01; P <.025) by rations high in protein of high degradability during heat stress.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Milk yield -- Environmental aspects.; Cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Climatic factors.; Heat -- Physiological effect.; Holstein-Friesian cattle.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nutritional Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Huber, John T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInfluence of protein level and degradability on performance of lactating cows during hot and cool environmental temperatures.en_US
dc.creatorHigginbotham, Gerald Ernest.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHigginbotham, Gerald Ernest.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne hundred and twenty lactating Holstein cows in mid-lactation were offered diets varying in protein level and degradability at two locations during hot and moderate weather. Treatments were: (1) High protein (19%), high degradability (65%); (2) High protein (19%), medium degradability (40%); (3) Medium protein (15.5%), high degradability (65%); (4) Medium protein (15.5%), medium degradability (40%). Diets were individually fed during hot weather at the University of Arizona Dairy Farm and contained 38.4% alfalfa hay, 12.4% cottonseed hulls, 9.8% whole cottonseed, and 39.4% concentrate (dry matter). Diets were group fed during moderate weather at the Brigham Young University Dairy Farm, Provo, Ut, and contained 31.3% corn silage, 14% alfalfa haylage, 9.4% whole cottonseed and 45.3% concentrate (dry matter). Average daily ambient temperatures were 35.1°C for hot and 26.8°C for moderate weather locations. Fat-corrected milk (3.5%, 2 x milkings) and milk persistency were lower for treatment 1 than other treatments. For the respective treatments during hot weather means were: 23.4, 26.6, 28.5, 28.4 kg/d; 83.2, 91.2, 90.9, 90.3%; and for moderate weather means were: (3 x milkings): 34.7, 31.8, 32.2, 32.4 kg/d; 97.0, 93.4, 92.1, 90.3%. Dry matter intakes during hot weather were 21.5, 21.9, 23.3, and 23.1 kg/d. Respiration rate and rectal temperature during hot weather were: 90.1, 87.9, 90.9, 94.7 counts/min; 39.0, 39.3, 39.3, 39.5°C and for moderate weather: 61.2, 58.2, 55.5, 67.4 counts/min; 38.8, 38.6, 38.7, 38.8°C. Serum T₃,T₄ and cortisol were generally unaffected by treatment, but were depressed during hot weather. Serum glucose was not significantly affected by treatments at either environmental locations. Animals consumed more water with highly degradable protein diets at each location along with consuming more water during thermal stress. These data show that 3.5% fat-corrected milk and milk persistency are significantly affected (P <.01; P <.025) by rations high in protein of high degradability during heat stress.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMilk yield -- Environmental aspects.en_US
dc.subjectCattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Climatic factors.en_US
dc.subjectHeat -- Physiological effect.en_US
dc.subjectHolstein-Friesian cattle.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHuber, John T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReid, Bobby L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, William H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchuh, James D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWhiting, Frank M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8804175en_US
dc.identifier.oclc700055759en_US
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