Subterranean termite infestation of urban structures in the Tucson basin: Patterns and influences.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184258
Title:
Subterranean termite infestation of urban structures in the Tucson basin: Patterns and influences.
Author:
Colwell, Curt Edward.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A three-part study was conducted to characterize and assess the impact of subterranean termite infestation of urban structures in Tucson, Arizona. A termite control questionnaire was administered to all Tucson-based pest control firms offering termite control services, of which 52 percent responded. Twelve study sites were established in and around the city, with toilet paper rolls serving as termite bait at each site. In addition, 5943 active termite control contracts were accessed from Tucson's largest pest control company, and analyzed with accompanying data from various sources including those pertinent to structure location, construction, treatment history, and surrounding soil types. An estimate of over $3 million for gross annual income derived from commercial termite control services performed in Tucson, was calculated from questionnaire responses. Termide (heptachlor + chlordane) was the most frequently used termiticide. Approximately 45 percent of commercial termite control jobs were performed with Termide, the principal termiticide used by 85.7 percent of companies offering termite control services. Gnathamitermes perplexus (Banks) was most prevalent in the toilet paper rolls at bait sites, followed by Heterotermes aureus (Snyder) and Reticulitermes tibialis Banks. G. perplexus infested bait at sites that resembled the surrounding desert while H. aureus and R. tibialis generally infested those which had been significantly altered by irrigation and landscaping. H. aureus and, to a lesser degree, R. tibialis, are by far the most economically important of the 18 termite species inhabiting Tucson and the surrounding area. Significant interrelationships were found between termite contract density, customer affluence, housing density, structure age, and soil permeability, and also between retreatment rate, foundation type, and materials used in wall construction. The percentage of structures under contract requiring retreatment was estimated to be between 17.3 percent and 42.7 percent per year. Analysis utilizing termite control contracts is suggested as a unique and effective approach providing critical insight into factors influencing termite communities and patterns of infestation in the urban environment.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Termites -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Urban pests -- Arizona -- Tucson.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Entomology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSubterranean termite infestation of urban structures in the Tucson basin: Patterns and influences.en_US
dc.creatorColwell, Curt Edward.en_US
dc.contributor.authorColwell, Curt Edward.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA three-part study was conducted to characterize and assess the impact of subterranean termite infestation of urban structures in Tucson, Arizona. A termite control questionnaire was administered to all Tucson-based pest control firms offering termite control services, of which 52 percent responded. Twelve study sites were established in and around the city, with toilet paper rolls serving as termite bait at each site. In addition, 5943 active termite control contracts were accessed from Tucson's largest pest control company, and analyzed with accompanying data from various sources including those pertinent to structure location, construction, treatment history, and surrounding soil types. An estimate of over $3 million for gross annual income derived from commercial termite control services performed in Tucson, was calculated from questionnaire responses. Termide (heptachlor + chlordane) was the most frequently used termiticide. Approximately 45 percent of commercial termite control jobs were performed with Termide, the principal termiticide used by 85.7 percent of companies offering termite control services. Gnathamitermes perplexus (Banks) was most prevalent in the toilet paper rolls at bait sites, followed by Heterotermes aureus (Snyder) and Reticulitermes tibialis Banks. G. perplexus infested bait at sites that resembled the surrounding desert while H. aureus and R. tibialis generally infested those which had been significantly altered by irrigation and landscaping. H. aureus and, to a lesser degree, R. tibialis, are by far the most economically important of the 18 termite species inhabiting Tucson and the surrounding area. Significant interrelationships were found between termite contract density, customer affluence, housing density, structure age, and soil permeability, and also between retreatment rate, foundation type, and materials used in wall construction. The percentage of structures under contract requiring retreatment was estimated to be between 17.3 percent and 42.7 percent per year. Analysis utilizing termite control contracts is suggested as a unique and effective approach providing critical insight into factors influencing termite communities and patterns of infestation in the urban environment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTermites -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subjectUrban pests -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8804169en_US
dc.identifier.oclc700056077en_US
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