Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184255
Title:
Maternal attachment in the neonatal intensive care unit.
Author:
Brundage, Janice Kay.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon of maternal attachment as it specifically relates to moderate premature delivery. The study investigated the impact of educational, counseling and therapeutic interventions on mothers who delivered premature infants. Research hypotheses were that mothers who participated in the treatment group would demonstrate significant increases in the independent variables of self esteem, social networking and family function strategies. This study also hypothesized that there would be a significant positive relationship between treatment and the dependent variable of maternal attachment. The sample consisted of 30 mother-infant dyads between the ages of 15 and 38 years of age. Infants' gestational age ranged from 32 to 36 weeks. Data were gathered using three measures: (1) a demographic profile of the subjects; (2) a questionnaire including the Tennessee Self Concept Scale, Sarason's Life Event Survey, Norbeck's Social Support Questionnaire, Feetham's Family Function Index; and (3) Barnard's Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale (NCAFS). The research study consisted of a field experiment. Fifteen subjects were assigned to the experimental and control group via a modified randomized block procedure. A questionnaire was issued during infant's hospitalization and at 4 months post infant discharge from the hospital to measure the independent variable. The dependent variable was measured at 1 month, 2-1/2 months and 4 months using the NCAFS. Treatment consisted of a minimum of seven sessions during the infant's hospitalization and discharge to home. Statistical analyses were conducted in the form of frequency distributions, means, standard deviations, t-tests and correlation scores. Stepwise multiple regression techniques were used for predictor variables. Results indicated that mothers who participated in the treatment group demonstrated significantly improved maternal attachment processes than those mothers who did not receive intervention. The results did not indicate that there was a significant difference between the two groups on self esteem, social support, life events or family function. Implications for the study were noted. Recommendations for medical and mental health practitioners and future areas of research were discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Newlon, Betty J.
Committee Chair:
Newlon, Betty J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMaternal attachment in the neonatal intensive care unit.en_US
dc.creatorBrundage, Janice Kay.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrundage, Janice Kay.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon of maternal attachment as it specifically relates to moderate premature delivery. The study investigated the impact of educational, counseling and therapeutic interventions on mothers who delivered premature infants. Research hypotheses were that mothers who participated in the treatment group would demonstrate significant increases in the independent variables of self esteem, social networking and family function strategies. This study also hypothesized that there would be a significant positive relationship between treatment and the dependent variable of maternal attachment. The sample consisted of 30 mother-infant dyads between the ages of 15 and 38 years of age. Infants' gestational age ranged from 32 to 36 weeks. Data were gathered using three measures: (1) a demographic profile of the subjects; (2) a questionnaire including the Tennessee Self Concept Scale, Sarason's Life Event Survey, Norbeck's Social Support Questionnaire, Feetham's Family Function Index; and (3) Barnard's Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale (NCAFS). The research study consisted of a field experiment. Fifteen subjects were assigned to the experimental and control group via a modified randomized block procedure. A questionnaire was issued during infant's hospitalization and at 4 months post infant discharge from the hospital to measure the independent variable. The dependent variable was measured at 1 month, 2-1/2 months and 4 months using the NCAFS. Treatment consisted of a minimum of seven sessions during the infant's hospitalization and discharge to home. Statistical analyses were conducted in the form of frequency distributions, means, standard deviations, t-tests and correlation scores. Stepwise multiple regression techniques were used for predictor variables. Results indicated that mothers who participated in the treatment group demonstrated significantly improved maternal attachment processes than those mothers who did not receive intervention. The results did not indicate that there was a significant difference between the two groups on self esteem, social support, life events or family function. Implications for the study were noted. Recommendations for medical and mental health practitioners and future areas of research were discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNewlon, Betty J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairNewlon, Betty J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristensen, Oscaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAttarian, Peteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest8804166en_US
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