Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184250
Title:
THE INCORPORATION OF SULFUR-DIOXIDE INTO SNOW AND DEPOSITING ICE.
Author:
VALDEZ, MARC PHILIP.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Depth profiles of S(IV) and S(VI) in snow exposed to 20-140 ppbv SO₂ for 6 to 12 hours have been determined in 48 laboratory experiments. Surface deposition velocity (v(d)) averaged 0.06 cm s⁻¹. Well-metamorphosed snow, longer run times, higher SO₂ concentrations and colder snow were associated with lower values of v(d), and vice versa. Melting followed by draining increased v(d) greatly (0.14 cm s⁻¹. Any effect of ozone on SO₂ v(d) was undetectable. Most sulfur in the snow was as S(VI), even without added ozone, indicating the presence of other oxidants, especially in new snow. Four NO₂ deposition experiments (average v(d) = 0.007 cm s⁻¹), and one combined SO₂-NO₂ deposition experiment were conducted. Ozone, sunlight and SO₂ did not enhance NO₂ deposition; NO₂ and sunlight did not enhance SO₂ deposition. The deposition of SO₂ into a snowpack is modelled as an aqueous system, where the liquid water is considered to be present on snow grain surfaces. Gas transport into the snow, air-water partitioning, and aqueous-phase reactions are explicitly considered. Three oxidants (Fe- or Mn-catalyzed O₂, O₂, and H₂O₂) act to convert S(IV) to S(VI), acidify the film, and inhibit further S(IV) uptake. Model calculations illustrate the primary importance of liquid-water mass fraction (X(m)) and the secondary importance of oxidative reactions on SO₂ v(d) to snow. Model and experimental results are similar for assumed X(m) on the order of one percent. Experiments were also conducted on the incorporation of SO₂ into ice depositing from the vapor at -7 and -15°C. Remarkably, SO₂ is captured in deposited ice at concentrations comparable to Henry's Law equilibrium with water at 0°C. Ozone and HCHO appear to inhibit, not enhance, SO₂ capture. An aqueous-film model accounting for the capture of SO₂ by depositing ice was developed. S(IV) concentrations may be enhanced in the liquid-like layer on growing ice surfaces due to solute exclusion from the bulk ice and greatly-retarded diffusional transport from the ice/film interface, leading to significant incorporation into the ice despite low distribution coefficients. SO₂ snow scavenging ratios may be comparable to sulfate scavenging ratios in the remote troposphere.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Acid precipitation (Meteorology); Precipitation scavenging.; Sulfur dioxide.; Snow.; Ice.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Atmospheric Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dawson, George A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE INCORPORATION OF SULFUR-DIOXIDE INTO SNOW AND DEPOSITING ICE.en_US
dc.creatorVALDEZ, MARC PHILIP.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVALDEZ, MARC PHILIP.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDepth profiles of S(IV) and S(VI) in snow exposed to 20-140 ppbv SO₂ for 6 to 12 hours have been determined in 48 laboratory experiments. Surface deposition velocity (v(d)) averaged 0.06 cm s⁻¹. Well-metamorphosed snow, longer run times, higher SO₂ concentrations and colder snow were associated with lower values of v(d), and vice versa. Melting followed by draining increased v(d) greatly (0.14 cm s⁻¹. Any effect of ozone on SO₂ v(d) was undetectable. Most sulfur in the snow was as S(VI), even without added ozone, indicating the presence of other oxidants, especially in new snow. Four NO₂ deposition experiments (average v(d) = 0.007 cm s⁻¹), and one combined SO₂-NO₂ deposition experiment were conducted. Ozone, sunlight and SO₂ did not enhance NO₂ deposition; NO₂ and sunlight did not enhance SO₂ deposition. The deposition of SO₂ into a snowpack is modelled as an aqueous system, where the liquid water is considered to be present on snow grain surfaces. Gas transport into the snow, air-water partitioning, and aqueous-phase reactions are explicitly considered. Three oxidants (Fe- or Mn-catalyzed O₂, O₂, and H₂O₂) act to convert S(IV) to S(VI), acidify the film, and inhibit further S(IV) uptake. Model calculations illustrate the primary importance of liquid-water mass fraction (X(m)) and the secondary importance of oxidative reactions on SO₂ v(d) to snow. Model and experimental results are similar for assumed X(m) on the order of one percent. Experiments were also conducted on the incorporation of SO₂ into ice depositing from the vapor at -7 and -15°C. Remarkably, SO₂ is captured in deposited ice at concentrations comparable to Henry's Law equilibrium with water at 0°C. Ozone and HCHO appear to inhibit, not enhance, SO₂ capture. An aqueous-film model accounting for the capture of SO₂ by depositing ice was developed. S(IV) concentrations may be enhanced in the liquid-like layer on growing ice surfaces due to solute exclusion from the bulk ice and greatly-retarded diffusional transport from the ice/film interface, leading to significant incorporation into the ice despite low distribution coefficients. SO₂ snow scavenging ratios may be comparable to sulfate scavenging ratios in the remote troposphere.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAcid precipitation (Meteorology)en_US
dc.subjectPrecipitation scavenging.en_US
dc.subjectSulfur dioxide.en_US
dc.subjectSnow.en_US
dc.subjectIce.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDawson, George A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBales, Roger C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHill, Henry A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKohler, Sigurd H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStaley, Dean O.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8803267en_US
dc.identifier.oclc700053935en_US
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