Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184249
Title:
PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF FRACTURED ROCK MASSES.
Author:
SAVELY, JAMES PALMER.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Stability analysis of rock masses composed of small, discrete rock blocks that are in-place and interlocked should consider four components of failure: (1) Sliding between blocks. (2) Shearing through rock blocks. (3) Rolling blocks in a shear zone. (4) Crushing of rock blocks. Statistical rock mass description is used to define the characteristics of the rock blocks and the block assemblage. Clastic mechanics is one method of predicting stresses produced by the arrangement of rock blocks and the loading conditions. Failure begins at a point of maximum stress behind the slope. Progression of the failure is assumed if the first block fails because adjacent blocks will become overstressed. The location of the point of maximum stress is determined from the shape and arrangement of the constituent rock blocks. Because strength is mobilized block-by-block rather than instantaneously along a continuous shear surface, sliding between blocks shows less stability than a soil rotational shear analysis or a rigid block sliding analysis. Shearing through rock blocks occurs when maximum shear stress exceeds rock shear strength. Crushing of rock blocks is predicted if the normal stress exceeds the compressive strength of the rock block. A size-strength relationship is combined with the rock block size distribution curve to estimate crushing strength. Rotating blocks in a shear zone have been observed in model studies and as a mechanism in landslides. Stability analysis assumes that the rock mass is sufficiently loosened by blasting and excavation to allow blocks to rotate. The shear strength of rolling blocks is dynamic shear strength that is less than static sliding shear strength. This rolling mechanism can explain release of slope failures where there are no other obvious structural controls. Stability of each component of rock mass failure is calculated separately using capacity-demand reliability. These results are combined as a series-connected system to give the overall stability of the rock mass. This probability of failure for the rock mass system explicitly accounts for the four components of rock mass failure. Criteria for recognizing rock mass failure potential and examples applying the proposed method are presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Rock mechanics.; Fracture mechanics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Mining Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Daemen, Jaak J. K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF FRACTURED ROCK MASSES.en_US
dc.creatorSAVELY, JAMES PALMER.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSAVELY, JAMES PALMER.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractStability analysis of rock masses composed of small, discrete rock blocks that are in-place and interlocked should consider four components of failure: (1) Sliding between blocks. (2) Shearing through rock blocks. (3) Rolling blocks in a shear zone. (4) Crushing of rock blocks. Statistical rock mass description is used to define the characteristics of the rock blocks and the block assemblage. Clastic mechanics is one method of predicting stresses produced by the arrangement of rock blocks and the loading conditions. Failure begins at a point of maximum stress behind the slope. Progression of the failure is assumed if the first block fails because adjacent blocks will become overstressed. The location of the point of maximum stress is determined from the shape and arrangement of the constituent rock blocks. Because strength is mobilized block-by-block rather than instantaneously along a continuous shear surface, sliding between blocks shows less stability than a soil rotational shear analysis or a rigid block sliding analysis. Shearing through rock blocks occurs when maximum shear stress exceeds rock shear strength. Crushing of rock blocks is predicted if the normal stress exceeds the compressive strength of the rock block. A size-strength relationship is combined with the rock block size distribution curve to estimate crushing strength. Rotating blocks in a shear zone have been observed in model studies and as a mechanism in landslides. Stability analysis assumes that the rock mass is sufficiently loosened by blasting and excavation to allow blocks to rotate. The shear strength of rolling blocks is dynamic shear strength that is less than static sliding shear strength. This rolling mechanism can explain release of slope failures where there are no other obvious structural controls. Stability of each component of rock mass failure is calculated separately using capacity-demand reliability. These results are combined as a series-connected system to give the overall stability of the rock mass. This probability of failure for the rock mass system explicitly accounts for the four components of rock mass failure. Criteria for recognizing rock mass failure potential and examples applying the proposed method are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRock mechanics.en_US
dc.subjectFracture mechanics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDaemen, Jaak J. K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFarmer, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlass, Charles E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNowatzki, Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeNatale, Jay S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8803266en_US
dc.identifier.oclc700053930en_US
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