SENSITIVITY TO THERAPIST VALUES, VALUE CONVERGENCE AND OUTCOME IN GROUP COGNITIVE THERAPY.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184240
Title:
SENSITIVITY TO THERAPIST VALUES, VALUE CONVERGENCE AND OUTCOME IN GROUP COGNITIVE THERAPY.
Author:
HAMBLIN, DAVID LEE.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Value convergence refers to the empirical finding that in successful psychotherapy patients adopt their therapist's values. This study examines the relationship between therapy outcome and the following predictor variables: The initial similarity of patient and therapist values; patient sensitivity to therapist values; value convergence, changes in dysfunctional beliefs, and patient's ability to predict therapist's values. Previous attempts to define values are examined as well as conceptualizations of the relationship of values to psychotherapy. The empirical research relating to value change and psychotherapy is reviewed. A growing body of literature has largely confirmed the value convergence phenomenon. Methodological weaknesses in this literature are discussed. The related research area in cognitive therapy concerning the relationship of belief changes and depression is also reviewed, followed by a summary of cognitive therapy (CT) theory and practice. A total of 29 depressed older adults were randomly assigned to group CT or to a medication (alprazdam)/supportive therapy condition. The Rokeach Value Survey (RVS) assessed value similarity, value convergence and subject predictions of therapist values. A scale developed here, the Treatment Sensitivity Survey (TSS), assessed sensitivity to therapist values. The Cognitive Error Questionnaire (CEQ) measured changes in dysfunctional cognitions. Of these variables only sensitivity to therapist values significantly predicted improvement as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory. Initial values similarity also predicted value convergence. Subjects in the CT condition evidenced greater value convergence and made more accurate predictions of therapist values.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cognitive therapy.; Values.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beutler, Larry
Committee Chair:
Beutler, Larry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSENSITIVITY TO THERAPIST VALUES, VALUE CONVERGENCE AND OUTCOME IN GROUP COGNITIVE THERAPY.en_US
dc.creatorHAMBLIN, DAVID LEE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHAMBLIN, DAVID LEE.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractValue convergence refers to the empirical finding that in successful psychotherapy patients adopt their therapist's values. This study examines the relationship between therapy outcome and the following predictor variables: The initial similarity of patient and therapist values; patient sensitivity to therapist values; value convergence, changes in dysfunctional beliefs, and patient's ability to predict therapist's values. Previous attempts to define values are examined as well as conceptualizations of the relationship of values to psychotherapy. The empirical research relating to value change and psychotherapy is reviewed. A growing body of literature has largely confirmed the value convergence phenomenon. Methodological weaknesses in this literature are discussed. The related research area in cognitive therapy concerning the relationship of belief changes and depression is also reviewed, followed by a summary of cognitive therapy (CT) theory and practice. A total of 29 depressed older adults were randomly assigned to group CT or to a medication (alprazdam)/supportive therapy condition. The Rokeach Value Survey (RVS) assessed value similarity, value convergence and subject predictions of therapist values. A scale developed here, the Treatment Sensitivity Survey (TSS), assessed sensitivity to therapist values. The Cognitive Error Questionnaire (CEQ) measured changes in dysfunctional cognitions. Of these variables only sensitivity to therapist values significantly predicted improvement as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory. Initial values similarity also predicted value convergence. Subjects in the CT condition evidenced greater value convergence and made more accurate predictions of therapist values.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCognitive therapy.en_US
dc.subjectValues.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBeutler, Larryen_US
dc.contributor.chairBeutler, Larryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDomino, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMadison, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWren, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest8803257en_US
dc.identifier.oclc700052150en_US
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