AN APPLICATION OF COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL SELF-CONTROL PROCEDURES WITH HOSPITALIZED ADOLESCENTS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184209
Title:
AN APPLICATION OF COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL SELF-CONTROL PROCEDURES WITH HOSPITALIZED ADOLESCENTS.
Author:
ELIAS, DENNIS CHARLES.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study assessed the efficacy of the application of cognitive-behavioral self control therapy with a sample of psychiatrically impaired adolescents. Ten adolescent inpatients (5 male/5 female), residing within the Adolescent Unit of the State Hospital of a Southwestern state, were selected as subjects. Subjects ranged in age from 12 to 17 years and were paid volunteers. Subjects were assessed pretreatment for non self controlled behavior via the teacher rated Self Control Rating Scale (Kendall & Wilcox, 1979). This measure also served as the blocking variable utilized for random assignment to treatment or control group. Five adolescents were assigned to each group. Pretreatment measures of social perspective taking (Chandler Bystander Cartoons; Chandler, 1973) and social problem solving (Means-Ends Problem Solving test: Platt & Spivack, 1975) were taken additionally. All three measures were repeated at posttreatment and at 4 week follow-up. Treatment consisted of twelve 60-minute sessions held 3 times a week over the period of 4 weeks. The treatment consisted of a group application of Kendall's (1980) Cognitive-Behavioral Self Control therapy. The main treatment strategies included: (1) a problem solving approach, (2) self instructional training, (3) behavioral contingencies, (4) modeling, (5) affective education, and (6) role play exercises. The separate strategies were essentially interwoven. Except for the cognitive-behavioral self control training proper, subjects in both treatment and control groups were given similar tasks, task instructions, and performance feedback. Results found a range of behavioral self control skills distributed among the subjects but failed to support the hypothesis of associated poor social perspective taking and social problem solving skills. Treatment failed to improve teacher ratings of behavioral self control at posttreatment and at follow-up. Likewise, no significant improvement was found in social problem solving skills at posttreatment or follow-up, although a trend toward improvement was suggested. A significant improvement in social perspective taking skills was found in the treatment group at posttreatment. The improvement was maintained at 4 week follow-up. The results are interpreted as suggesting that cognitive-behavioral self control training can be useful in facilitating the further development and enhancement of previously inadequate cognitive capacities in psychiatrically impaired, non self controlled adolescents. Certain suggestions for enhancing the effectiveness and generalization of the treatment approach are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cognitive therapy.; Adolescent psychotherapy.; Self-control.; Teenagers.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christiansen, Harley
Committee Chair:
Christiansen, Harley

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAN APPLICATION OF COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL SELF-CONTROL PROCEDURES WITH HOSPITALIZED ADOLESCENTS.en_US
dc.creatorELIAS, DENNIS CHARLES.en_US
dc.contributor.authorELIAS, DENNIS CHARLES.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the efficacy of the application of cognitive-behavioral self control therapy with a sample of psychiatrically impaired adolescents. Ten adolescent inpatients (5 male/5 female), residing within the Adolescent Unit of the State Hospital of a Southwestern state, were selected as subjects. Subjects ranged in age from 12 to 17 years and were paid volunteers. Subjects were assessed pretreatment for non self controlled behavior via the teacher rated Self Control Rating Scale (Kendall & Wilcox, 1979). This measure also served as the blocking variable utilized for random assignment to treatment or control group. Five adolescents were assigned to each group. Pretreatment measures of social perspective taking (Chandler Bystander Cartoons; Chandler, 1973) and social problem solving (Means-Ends Problem Solving test: Platt & Spivack, 1975) were taken additionally. All three measures were repeated at posttreatment and at 4 week follow-up. Treatment consisted of twelve 60-minute sessions held 3 times a week over the period of 4 weeks. The treatment consisted of a group application of Kendall's (1980) Cognitive-Behavioral Self Control therapy. The main treatment strategies included: (1) a problem solving approach, (2) self instructional training, (3) behavioral contingencies, (4) modeling, (5) affective education, and (6) role play exercises. The separate strategies were essentially interwoven. Except for the cognitive-behavioral self control training proper, subjects in both treatment and control groups were given similar tasks, task instructions, and performance feedback. Results found a range of behavioral self control skills distributed among the subjects but failed to support the hypothesis of associated poor social perspective taking and social problem solving skills. Treatment failed to improve teacher ratings of behavioral self control at posttreatment and at follow-up. Likewise, no significant improvement was found in social problem solving skills at posttreatment or follow-up, although a trend toward improvement was suggested. A significant improvement in social perspective taking skills was found in the treatment group at posttreatment. The improvement was maintained at 4 week follow-up. The results are interpreted as suggesting that cognitive-behavioral self control training can be useful in facilitating the further development and enhancement of previously inadequate cognitive capacities in psychiatrically impaired, non self controlled adolescents. Certain suggestions for enhancing the effectiveness and generalization of the treatment approach are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCognitive therapy.en_US
dc.subjectAdolescent psychotherapy.en_US
dc.subjectSelf-control.en_US
dc.subjectTeenagers.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristiansen, Harleyen_US
dc.contributor.chairChristiansen, Harleyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewlon, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristensen, Oscaren_US
dc.identifier.proquest8727923en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698758157en_US
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