THE EFFECTS OF PEER MODELING ON CHILDREN'S SELF-EFFICACY AND PERSISTENCE.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184203
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF PEER MODELING ON CHILDREN'S SELF-EFFICACY AND PERSISTENCE.
Author:
DEWITT, MELANIE KING.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Few research efforts have tested Bandura's Self-Efficacy Theory in an educational setting. Though the results from these studies have provided support for this theory's applicability in this setting, the effects of certain model behaviors and characteristics have not yet been determined. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of videotaped peer models on children's self-efficacy judgments and persistence times on an intellectual task. One hundred and sixty-two fourth grade children were randomly assigned to one of eight experimental conditions or one control condition with equal numbers of males and females in each condition. Eight videotapes constituted the eight experimental conditions. Each tape consisted of either a male or female peer model trying to solve a block puzzle at one of two levels of persistence and success. Children's persistence on the insolvable block puzzle was measured by time in seconds, while an efficacy scale assessed children's conviction that they could master the block puzzle. It was found that children's persistence times and self-efficacy judgments regarding a block puzzle task were influenced by a model's persistence and success behaviors. Model persistence was more influential than model success on children's persistence, while self-efficacy was influenced only by model success. Sex of the model and sex of the subject did not affect children's persistence times; however, sex of the subject did affect children's self-efficacy judgments. The research findings were discussed in terms of: (1) The role of self-efficacy as a cognitive mediator, (2) Same-sex versus different sex modeling, (3) The utility and strength of videotaped modeling relative to live modeling, and (4) Peer models versus adult models.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Achievement motivation.; Persistence.; Imitation.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nicholson, Glen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF PEER MODELING ON CHILDREN'S SELF-EFFICACY AND PERSISTENCE.en_US
dc.creatorDEWITT, MELANIE KING.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDEWITT, MELANIE KING.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFew research efforts have tested Bandura's Self-Efficacy Theory in an educational setting. Though the results from these studies have provided support for this theory's applicability in this setting, the effects of certain model behaviors and characteristics have not yet been determined. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of videotaped peer models on children's self-efficacy judgments and persistence times on an intellectual task. One hundred and sixty-two fourth grade children were randomly assigned to one of eight experimental conditions or one control condition with equal numbers of males and females in each condition. Eight videotapes constituted the eight experimental conditions. Each tape consisted of either a male or female peer model trying to solve a block puzzle at one of two levels of persistence and success. Children's persistence on the insolvable block puzzle was measured by time in seconds, while an efficacy scale assessed children's conviction that they could master the block puzzle. It was found that children's persistence times and self-efficacy judgments regarding a block puzzle task were influenced by a model's persistence and success behaviors. Model persistence was more influential than model success on children's persistence, while self-efficacy was influenced only by model success. Sex of the model and sex of the subject did not affect children's persistence times; however, sex of the subject did affect children's self-efficacy judgments. The research findings were discussed in terms of: (1) The role of self-efficacy as a cognitive mediator, (2) Same-sex versus different sex modeling, (3) The utility and strength of videotaped modeling relative to live modeling, and (4) Peer models versus adult models.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAchievement motivation.en_US
dc.subjectPersistence.en_US
dc.subjectImitation.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNicholson, Glenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8223008en_US
dc.identifier.oclc682665466en_US
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