THE EFFECT OF HALF-DAY AND FULL-DAY SCHEDULES ON THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF KINDERGARTEN CHILDREN.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184201
Title:
THE EFFECT OF HALF-DAY AND FULL-DAY SCHEDULES ON THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF KINDERGARTEN CHILDREN.
Author:
RIVERA, ANNA LYDIA FISHER.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of the study was to determine whether a significant difference existed in the academic achievement of students as a function of attending half-day or full-day kindergartens. The hypothesis was students in full-day kindergartens will demonstrate more growth in academic achievement than students in half-day kindergartens as measured by the Head Start Measurements Battery (HSMB) in seven areas: language, math, nature/science, perception, reading, social development, and overall score. One hundred subjects were randomly selected from 158 qualified subjects that attended four Chapter 1 schools in a public school district in Southern Arizona. Four half-day and five full-day kindergartens participated. Five classes implemented a bilingual curriculum, one a Spanish curriculum, and three an English curriculum. Eventually, 74 subjects were pretested in November 1984 and posttested in May 1985. The majority of the subjects were Hispanics. Based on the literature review, the need to assess children in English/Spanish/bilingually, the need for an individually administered test of a manipulative nature, and the need for a psychometrically sound instrument, the Fall 1984 version of the Head Start Measures Battery was selected. It assesses the three-to-six-year-old child's cognitive development. The research design used was a quasi-experimental approach: the non-equivalent control group design. The independent variables were the schedules and the dependent variables were the seven areas measured by the HSMB. Mean gain scores were calculated in each of the seven areas. A t-test was used to analyze the data. The results indicated that there was a statistically significant difference (p<.05) between the mean gain scores of the half-day and full-day kindergartens (in favor of the full-day kindergartens) in language, math, and reading. The evidence failed to indicate a statistically significant difference in nature/science, perception, social development, and overall scores. In conclusion, the findings suggested that there was greater academic achievement in languages, math, and reading for full-day than for half-day kindergarten students. The findings failed to provide evidence of a difference in the academic achievement of half-day and full-day kindergarten students in nature/science, perception, social development, and overall scores.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Kindergarten.; Full-day kindergarten.; Academic achievement.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Elementary Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lopez, Richard L.
Committee Chair:
Lopez, Richard L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF HALF-DAY AND FULL-DAY SCHEDULES ON THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF KINDERGARTEN CHILDREN.en_US
dc.creatorRIVERA, ANNA LYDIA FISHER.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRIVERA, ANNA LYDIA FISHER.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to determine whether a significant difference existed in the academic achievement of students as a function of attending half-day or full-day kindergartens. The hypothesis was students in full-day kindergartens will demonstrate more growth in academic achievement than students in half-day kindergartens as measured by the Head Start Measurements Battery (HSMB) in seven areas: language, math, nature/science, perception, reading, social development, and overall score. One hundred subjects were randomly selected from 158 qualified subjects that attended four Chapter 1 schools in a public school district in Southern Arizona. Four half-day and five full-day kindergartens participated. Five classes implemented a bilingual curriculum, one a Spanish curriculum, and three an English curriculum. Eventually, 74 subjects were pretested in November 1984 and posttested in May 1985. The majority of the subjects were Hispanics. Based on the literature review, the need to assess children in English/Spanish/bilingually, the need for an individually administered test of a manipulative nature, and the need for a psychometrically sound instrument, the Fall 1984 version of the Head Start Measures Battery was selected. It assesses the three-to-six-year-old child's cognitive development. The research design used was a quasi-experimental approach: the non-equivalent control group design. The independent variables were the schedules and the dependent variables were the seven areas measured by the HSMB. Mean gain scores were calculated in each of the seven areas. A t-test was used to analyze the data. The results indicated that there was a statistically significant difference (p<.05) between the mean gain scores of the half-day and full-day kindergartens (in favor of the full-day kindergartens) in language, math, and reading. The evidence failed to indicate a statistically significant difference in nature/science, perception, social development, and overall scores. In conclusion, the findings suggested that there was greater academic achievement in languages, math, and reading for full-day than for half-day kindergarten students. The findings failed to provide evidence of a difference in the academic achievement of half-day and full-day kindergarten students in nature/science, perception, social development, and overall scores.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectKindergarten.en_US
dc.subjectFull-day kindergarten.en_US
dc.subjectAcademic achievement.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElementary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLopez, Richard L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairLopez, Richard L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuentevilla, Armindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Donna M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRomero, Guadalupeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaldate, Macarioen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8727783en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698755757en_US
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