THE EFFECTS OF A VOCABULARY LEARNING STRATEGY ON THE COMPREHENSION OF SCIENCE CONCEPTS (LEARNING-DISABLED).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184200
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF A VOCABULARY LEARNING STRATEGY ON THE COMPREHENSION OF SCIENCE CONCEPTS (LEARNING-DISABLED).
Author:
MILLER, ROSEMARY.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The aging of the learning disabled population has necessitated the development of instructional methods designed to meet the unique requirements of the secondary setting. Learning strategies have been proposed as viable alternatives to the tutorial and basic skills approaches. This study investigated the effects of a vocabulary learning strategy, SOS, on science concepts. Six mainstreamed learning disabled adolescents who attended a high school resource room one period per day took part in this five month study. The design was a multiple baseline across two sets of three subjects. A continuous baseline was maintained for each subject, followed by staggered application of the independent variable. The independent variable was a vocabulary learning strategy called SOS, an acronym for Search, Operate and Study. The dependent variables were tests of science vocabulary definitions and meanings at instructional and grade level. The experimental phases included (a) baseline, (b) intervention which included training in instructional level materials and generalization to grade level materials, (c) maintenance of the strategy over time and (d) retraining if the strategy was not maintained. Criterion measures of strategy training in instructional level materials and strategy generalization to grade level materials were recorded during the intervention phase of the study. A pre and post measure of student attitude toward science was administered prior to and at the end of the study. Visual analysis of the data indicated that this vocabulary learning strategy positively affected performance on grade level and instructional level science vocabulary tests for all subjects. Five of the six subjects were able to apply the total strategy to instructional level materials and generalize it to grade level materials. All subjects maintained at least part of the strategy. Strategy training positively affected attitudes toward studying science and science vocabulary. Overall findings were discussed in the context of learner characteristics and strategy efficacy.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Learning disabled youth.; Learning.; Reading comprehension.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCarthy, Jeanne McRae

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF A VOCABULARY LEARNING STRATEGY ON THE COMPREHENSION OF SCIENCE CONCEPTS (LEARNING-DISABLED).en_US
dc.creatorMILLER, ROSEMARY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMILLER, ROSEMARY.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe aging of the learning disabled population has necessitated the development of instructional methods designed to meet the unique requirements of the secondary setting. Learning strategies have been proposed as viable alternatives to the tutorial and basic skills approaches. This study investigated the effects of a vocabulary learning strategy, SOS, on science concepts. Six mainstreamed learning disabled adolescents who attended a high school resource room one period per day took part in this five month study. The design was a multiple baseline across two sets of three subjects. A continuous baseline was maintained for each subject, followed by staggered application of the independent variable. The independent variable was a vocabulary learning strategy called SOS, an acronym for Search, Operate and Study. The dependent variables were tests of science vocabulary definitions and meanings at instructional and grade level. The experimental phases included (a) baseline, (b) intervention which included training in instructional level materials and generalization to grade level materials, (c) maintenance of the strategy over time and (d) retraining if the strategy was not maintained. Criterion measures of strategy training in instructional level materials and strategy generalization to grade level materials were recorded during the intervention phase of the study. A pre and post measure of student attitude toward science was administered prior to and at the end of the study. Visual analysis of the data indicated that this vocabulary learning strategy positively affected performance on grade level and instructional level science vocabulary tests for all subjects. Five of the six subjects were able to apply the total strategy to instructional level materials and generalize it to grade level materials. All subjects maintained at least part of the strategy. Strategy training positively affected attitudes toward studying science and science vocabulary. Overall findings were discussed in the context of learner characteristics and strategy efficacy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLearning disabled youth.en_US
dc.subjectLearning.en_US
dc.subjectReading comprehension.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCarthy, Jeanne McRaeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8727782en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698755281en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.