Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184190
Title:
GENDER, SELF-PERCEPTION AND EATING BEHAVIOR.
Author:
VANN, BARBARA HOLCOMBE.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research, based on a random sample of undergraduates at the University of Arizona, is an exploration of the relationships between normative conformity, self-perception, and eating behavior. The goal of this study was to examine how norms governing appearance and sex roles contribute to a view of self that may result in serious eating problems. Three dimensions of self were included in the study: body image, control, and orientation to others. Specifically, it was hypothesized that overconformity would contribute to a self-concept defined in terms of negative body image, including a high degree of weight consciousness, strong need to exercise self-constraint, and high degree of orientation to others. In turn, this negative self image is likely to be associated with eating behavior which may be described as "weight obsessed," although not necessarily meeting clinical criteria for eating disorders. One of the major purposes of this research was to examine gender differences in the processes contributing to disturbances in eating behavior. It was hypothesized that definitions of the female and male self would have different outcomes in terms of eating behavior. It was also hypothesized that conformity to norms would be a more salient issue for females than for males. Findings of this research indicate that females experience more disturbed eating than males; that societal standards of appearance do affect eating behavior of both females and males, although this effect is greater for females; and that a self-concept defined in terms of negative body image, high weight consciousness, need for constraint, and feelings of failure/inadequacy contribute to problematic eating among females. These results imply that solutions to the problem of disordered eating must be examined in terms of social causes: specifically, current definitions of femininity, attractiveness, and self-concept.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Body image.; Beauty, Personal.; Eating disorders -- Sex differences.; Self-perception -- Social aspects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
MacCorquodale, Pat

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGENDER, SELF-PERCEPTION AND EATING BEHAVIOR.en_US
dc.creatorVANN, BARBARA HOLCOMBE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVANN, BARBARA HOLCOMBE.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research, based on a random sample of undergraduates at the University of Arizona, is an exploration of the relationships between normative conformity, self-perception, and eating behavior. The goal of this study was to examine how norms governing appearance and sex roles contribute to a view of self that may result in serious eating problems. Three dimensions of self were included in the study: body image, control, and orientation to others. Specifically, it was hypothesized that overconformity would contribute to a self-concept defined in terms of negative body image, including a high degree of weight consciousness, strong need to exercise self-constraint, and high degree of orientation to others. In turn, this negative self image is likely to be associated with eating behavior which may be described as "weight obsessed," although not necessarily meeting clinical criteria for eating disorders. One of the major purposes of this research was to examine gender differences in the processes contributing to disturbances in eating behavior. It was hypothesized that definitions of the female and male self would have different outcomes in terms of eating behavior. It was also hypothesized that conformity to norms would be a more salient issue for females than for males. Findings of this research indicate that females experience more disturbed eating than males; that societal standards of appearance do affect eating behavior of both females and males, although this effect is greater for females; and that a self-concept defined in terms of negative body image, high weight consciousness, need for constraint, and feelings of failure/inadequacy contribute to problematic eating among females. These results imply that solutions to the problem of disordered eating must be examined in terms of social causes: specifically, current definitions of femininity, attractiveness, and self-concept.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBody image.en_US
dc.subjectBeauty, Personal.en_US
dc.subjectEating disorders -- Sex differences.en_US
dc.subjectSelf-perception -- Social aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMacCorquodale, Paten_US
dc.identifier.proquest8726847en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698751448en_US
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