ANOREXIA NERVOSA, BULIMIA, AND OBESITY: BODY WEIGHT AND BULIMIA AS DISCRIMINATORS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184177
Title:
ANOREXIA NERVOSA, BULIMIA, AND OBESITY: BODY WEIGHT AND BULIMIA AS DISCRIMINATORS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS.
Author:
PAZDA, SUSAN LYNN.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study hypothesized body weight and eating patterns to be important discriminators of psychological characteristics among eating disordered groups. A total of 146 bulimic and non-bulimic women from underweight (anorexic), normal weight, and overweight (obese) categories were examined. Based upon the theoretical and research literature reviewed, this study hypothesized locus of control, personal potency, self-esteem, and psychopathology to be central psychological characteristics in anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and obesity. These variables were measured by Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale, the Semantic Differential Potency Scale, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, respectively. The relative importance of these variables in the disorders was also addressed. Results showed women in the eating disordered groups examined to demonstrate the following psychological characteristics: (1) Non-bulimic anorexics--an external locus of control, low self-esteem, and hysteria; (2) Bulimic anorexics--the greatest external locus of control, the lowest self-esteem, psychopathic deviance, hysteria, thought disorder, depression, a preoccupation with somatic concerns, and hypofemininity; (3) Normal weight bulimics--an external locus of control, low self-esteem, psychopathic deviance, hysteria, thought disorder, and depression; (4) Non-bulimic obese--low self-esteem; and (5) Bulimic obese--low self-esteem, an external locus of control, thought disorder and depression. The primary conclusion drawn from this study is that bulimia is a better predictor of the psychological characteristics than body weight. Bulimia, across all weight categories, was associated with an external locus of control, low self-esteem, psychopathic deviance, hysteria, thought disorder, and depression. That there was little variability in personality characteristics associated with bulimia across weight categories emphasized the stability of the symptom constellation associated with this disorder. This study supported the view of the normal weight bulimic as psychologically similar to the bulimic anorexic. This study also supported the stance that simple obesity does not represent a unitary psychological disorder.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anorexia nervosa -- Psychological aspects.; Bulimia -- Psychological aspects.; Obesity -- Psychological aspects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleANOREXIA NERVOSA, BULIMIA, AND OBESITY: BODY WEIGHT AND BULIMIA AS DISCRIMINATORS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS.en_US
dc.creatorPAZDA, SUSAN LYNN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPAZDA, SUSAN LYNN.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study hypothesized body weight and eating patterns to be important discriminators of psychological characteristics among eating disordered groups. A total of 146 bulimic and non-bulimic women from underweight (anorexic), normal weight, and overweight (obese) categories were examined. Based upon the theoretical and research literature reviewed, this study hypothesized locus of control, personal potency, self-esteem, and psychopathology to be central psychological characteristics in anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and obesity. These variables were measured by Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale, the Semantic Differential Potency Scale, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, respectively. The relative importance of these variables in the disorders was also addressed. Results showed women in the eating disordered groups examined to demonstrate the following psychological characteristics: (1) Non-bulimic anorexics--an external locus of control, low self-esteem, and hysteria; (2) Bulimic anorexics--the greatest external locus of control, the lowest self-esteem, psychopathic deviance, hysteria, thought disorder, depression, a preoccupation with somatic concerns, and hypofemininity; (3) Normal weight bulimics--an external locus of control, low self-esteem, psychopathic deviance, hysteria, thought disorder, and depression; (4) Non-bulimic obese--low self-esteem; and (5) Bulimic obese--low self-esteem, an external locus of control, thought disorder and depression. The primary conclusion drawn from this study is that bulimia is a better predictor of the psychological characteristics than body weight. Bulimia, across all weight categories, was associated with an external locus of control, low self-esteem, psychopathic deviance, hysteria, thought disorder, and depression. That there was little variability in personality characteristics associated with bulimia across weight categories emphasized the stability of the symptom constellation associated with this disorder. This study supported the view of the normal weight bulimic as psychologically similar to the bulimic anorexic. This study also supported the stance that simple obesity does not represent a unitary psychological disorder.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnorexia nervosa -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectBulimia -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectObesity -- Psychological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWrenn, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHsiao, Sigmunden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewlon, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristensen, Oscaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShisslak, Catherineen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8726835en_US
dc.identifier.oclc699804793en_US
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