EDUCATIONAL AND CURRICULAR FACTORS AFFECTING PHYSICIAN PRACTICE LOCATION.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184120
Title:
EDUCATIONAL AND CURRICULAR FACTORS AFFECTING PHYSICIAN PRACTICE LOCATION.
Author:
TIEDEMANN, MARJORIE LORA.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The primary purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between educational and curricular factors and physician location decisions. As a background to the study, a literature search traced the history of medical education in the U.S., focusing on various influences on physician distribution. In the research on physician location decision, this study is unique in its use of the constant comparative method. This method is an inductive approach developed and refined by Glaser and Strauss, used in this study to generate theory regarding the role of educational factors in physician location decisions. In this research, two groups of physicians who completed training after 1965 were selected for study, based on their locations in distinctly different practice settings in Arizona: urban and rural. An open-ended interview format was developed, and each physician was interviewed, with data analysis beginning during the first interview and continuing through the entire period of data collection. Using the constant comparative method, similar groups (rural physicians) were compared to bring out basic properties of categories, and different groups (urban physicians) were then compared to establish boundaries of applicability of the theory. As the interviews proceeded a basic theoretical framework emerged, enabling development of a grounded theory of physician location decisions. The study presents strong empirical evidence in support of the proposition that educational factors are influential in the decision of a physician to enter practice in a rural area. Four primary influences were identified: faculty role modeling, participation in rural clerkships, preceptorships, or required family practice rotations, service activities related to health care for medically underserved populations, and education in a non-traditional setting, or residency training in a rural area. Curriculum content and requirements take on major significance when these influences are subsumed under the major influence of socialization. The extent to which these educational factors play a role in the practice locations of physicians varies according to educational opportunities available during the training period.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physicians -- Supply and demand -- United States.; Medical education -- United States.; Professional socialization.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Conrad, Clifton F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEDUCATIONAL AND CURRICULAR FACTORS AFFECTING PHYSICIAN PRACTICE LOCATION.en_US
dc.creatorTIEDEMANN, MARJORIE LORA.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTIEDEMANN, MARJORIE LORA.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe primary purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between educational and curricular factors and physician location decisions. As a background to the study, a literature search traced the history of medical education in the U.S., focusing on various influences on physician distribution. In the research on physician location decision, this study is unique in its use of the constant comparative method. This method is an inductive approach developed and refined by Glaser and Strauss, used in this study to generate theory regarding the role of educational factors in physician location decisions. In this research, two groups of physicians who completed training after 1965 were selected for study, based on their locations in distinctly different practice settings in Arizona: urban and rural. An open-ended interview format was developed, and each physician was interviewed, with data analysis beginning during the first interview and continuing through the entire period of data collection. Using the constant comparative method, similar groups (rural physicians) were compared to bring out basic properties of categories, and different groups (urban physicians) were then compared to establish boundaries of applicability of the theory. As the interviews proceeded a basic theoretical framework emerged, enabling development of a grounded theory of physician location decisions. The study presents strong empirical evidence in support of the proposition that educational factors are influential in the decision of a physician to enter practice in a rural area. Four primary influences were identified: faculty role modeling, participation in rural clerkships, preceptorships, or required family practice rotations, service activities related to health care for medically underserved populations, and education in a non-traditional setting, or residency training in a rural area. Curriculum content and requirements take on major significance when these influences are subsumed under the major influence of socialization. The extent to which these educational factors play a role in the practice locations of physicians varies according to educational opportunities available during the training period.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysicians -- Supply and demand -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectMedical education -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectProfessional socialization.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorConrad, Clifton F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Arthur T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8715721en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698481811en_US
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