CROSS-CULTURAL COVENTURING: A MODEL, TAXONOMY, AND SOME COMPUTER IMPLICATIONS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184119
Title:
CROSS-CULTURAL COVENTURING: A MODEL, TAXONOMY, AND SOME COMPUTER IMPLICATIONS.
Author:
SCHLESSMAN-FROST, AMY C.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Both the public and private sectors currently encounter the telescoping urgency for effective cross-cultural coventuring in business, educational and personal arenas. Existing descriptive models for organizing cultural information are either simplistic and superficial or so complex as to be inaccessible or overwhelm the user. This study uses Saunders' theory of model construction as an informing hypothesis to develop a model for cross-cultural coventuring. An integral part of this conception is a definition of culture which uses Villemain's insightful concept of qualitative meaning. Integrating this type of meaning within Saunders' Inquiry Cube allows for categories through which even the most subtle and unarticulated variables making up the human enterprise and the value base of those cherished and celebrated human ideals can be sorted, classified, and set into a taxonomic design. This hierarchical pattern provides direction and parameters for greater cross-cultural exploration. The methodological sequence of the Cultural Inquiry Cube is further translated to a psychological sequence which is more readily comprehensible to the learner. The greatest potential for widespread use of this model seems to be in microcomputer applications. Compact disc technology including CD-ROM and CD-I promises accessibility not possible heretofore.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Intercultural communication.; Cross-cultural studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCROSS-CULTURAL COVENTURING: A MODEL, TAXONOMY, AND SOME COMPUTER IMPLICATIONS.en_US
dc.creatorSCHLESSMAN-FROST, AMY C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSCHLESSMAN-FROST, AMY C.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBoth the public and private sectors currently encounter the telescoping urgency for effective cross-cultural coventuring in business, educational and personal arenas. Existing descriptive models for organizing cultural information are either simplistic and superficial or so complex as to be inaccessible or overwhelm the user. This study uses Saunders' theory of model construction as an informing hypothesis to develop a model for cross-cultural coventuring. An integral part of this conception is a definition of culture which uses Villemain's insightful concept of qualitative meaning. Integrating this type of meaning within Saunders' Inquiry Cube allows for categories through which even the most subtle and unarticulated variables making up the human enterprise and the value base of those cherished and celebrated human ideals can be sorted, classified, and set into a taxonomic design. This hierarchical pattern provides direction and parameters for greater cross-cultural exploration. The methodological sequence of the Cultural Inquiry Cube is further translated to a psychological sequence which is more readily comprehensible to the learner. The greatest potential for widespread use of this model seems to be in microcomputer applications. Compact disc technology including CD-ROM and CD-I promises accessibility not possible heretofore.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIntercultural communication.en_US
dc.subjectCross-cultural studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuentevilla, Armindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDroegemueller, Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8715719en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698477453en_US
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