THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE TEACHING OF SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA USING MEDIA AND STUDENT RETENTION AND APPRECIATION (HAMLET).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184117
Title:
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE TEACHING OF SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA USING MEDIA AND STUDENT RETENTION AND APPRECIATION (HAMLET).
Author:
PORRECA-EASLEY, ZANA.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study described in this dissertation was conducted during a three week period and encompassed four senior high school English classes. The data derived from the study were elicited from a pre test of knowledge and a pre treatment attitude survey; a post test of knowledge and a post treatment attitude survey and a delayed post test of knowledge. The four groups of students were given the following treatments within the Shakespearean drama unit on Hamlet: (1) Group I - Students in this group were shown four teaching films on Hamlet and read the play aloud in class with students taking parts. (2) Group 2 - Students listened to a taped recording of the play and followed along with their books. (3) Group 3 - Students in this group listened to the taped recording of the play and were shown the four teaching films. (4) Group 4 - Students in this group, which was the control group, read the play aloud in class with students taking parts. The research questions which guided the research and were addressed through the statistical analysis were as follows: (1) What significant knowledge differences, if any, exist between and among the groups receiving the non-print media treatments and that group which did not? (2) Is there a difference in appreciation (attitudes) of Shakespearean drama between the groups which received the non-print media treatments and the group which did not? The statistical analysis of the data revealed that although all groups improved on the knowledge post test, groups 1 and 2 improved the most. Attitude scores also increased for group 1. Interestingly, the difference between pre treatment and post treatment attitude scores for group 2 was negligible, and for groups 3 and 4 decreased. The following conclusions were then drawn from the statistical analysis: (1) The use of non-print media does improve knowledge of and attitude about Shakespearean drama. (2) The use of non-print media should be limited, for example, to either taped recording or film for optimum results.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Study and teaching -- Audio-visual aids.; Audio-visual education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE TEACHING OF SHAKESPEAREAN DRAMA USING MEDIA AND STUDENT RETENTION AND APPRECIATION (HAMLET).en_US
dc.creatorPORRECA-EASLEY, ZANA.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPORRECA-EASLEY, ZANA.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study described in this dissertation was conducted during a three week period and encompassed four senior high school English classes. The data derived from the study were elicited from a pre test of knowledge and a pre treatment attitude survey; a post test of knowledge and a post treatment attitude survey and a delayed post test of knowledge. The four groups of students were given the following treatments within the Shakespearean drama unit on Hamlet: (1) Group I - Students in this group were shown four teaching films on Hamlet and read the play aloud in class with students taking parts. (2) Group 2 - Students listened to a taped recording of the play and followed along with their books. (3) Group 3 - Students in this group listened to the taped recording of the play and were shown the four teaching films. (4) Group 4 - Students in this group, which was the control group, read the play aloud in class with students taking parts. The research questions which guided the research and were addressed through the statistical analysis were as follows: (1) What significant knowledge differences, if any, exist between and among the groups receiving the non-print media treatments and that group which did not? (2) Is there a difference in appreciation (attitudes) of Shakespearean drama between the groups which received the non-print media treatments and the group which did not? The statistical analysis of the data revealed that although all groups improved on the knowledge post test, groups 1 and 2 improved the most. Attitude scores also increased for group 1. Interestingly, the difference between pre treatment and post treatment attitude scores for group 2 was negligible, and for groups 3 and 4 decreased. The following conclusions were then drawn from the statistical analysis: (1) The use of non-print media does improve knowledge of and attitude about Shakespearean drama. (2) The use of non-print media should be limited, for example, to either taped recording or film for optimum results.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectShakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Study and teaching -- Audio-visual aids.en_US
dc.subjectAudio-visual education.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8715717en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698477451en_US
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