THE EFFECTS OF A SHORT-ACTING BENZODIAZEPINE, TRIAZOLAM, ON AROUSALS, BODY MOVEMENTS, AND QUALITY OF SLEEP IN POSTMENOPAUSAL FEMALES.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184111
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF A SHORT-ACTING BENZODIAZEPINE, TRIAZOLAM, ON AROUSALS, BODY MOVEMENTS, AND QUALITY OF SLEEP IN POSTMENOPAUSAL FEMALES.
Author:
DAVIS-SHARTS, JEAN ELIZABETH.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of triazolam, a short-acting benzodiazepine, on nocturnal arousals, body movements, and quality of sleep in healthy, postmenopausal females. A double-blind control by constancy cross-over design was employed. Twelve subjects were randomly assigned to the sequence paradigm placebo, drug, placebo, drug or to the sequence paradigm drug, placebo, drug, placebo. Each subject slept for six nights in a sleep laboratory that was specifically designed to decrease the artificiality of the laboratory setting. EEG, EOG, and EMG measurements were recorded on a polysomnograph. Body movements were recorded on videotape and measured by radar and ultrasound instruments. Sleep quality was measured using both Likert and visual analogue scales. In examining arousal activity during sleep period time, the findings demonstrated a significant decrease in wakes after sleep onset (WASO), sleep stage one episodes, and sleep stage shifts when triazolam was compared to a placebo reference. There was no significant effect on K-complex activity associated with movement. In examining body movements during the sleep period time, the findings demonstrated a significant decrease in major body movements when triazolam was compared to a placebo reference. Minor body movements were increased, but not at significant levels. In examining the subject's perceived quality of sleep, their satisfaction with sleep was significantly increased on nights following triazolam administration when compared with nights following placebo administration.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Benzodiazepines.; Tranquilizing drugs.; Hypnotics.; Sleep -- Age factors.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF A SHORT-ACTING BENZODIAZEPINE, TRIAZOLAM, ON AROUSALS, BODY MOVEMENTS, AND QUALITY OF SLEEP IN POSTMENOPAUSAL FEMALES.en_US
dc.creatorDAVIS-SHARTS, JEAN ELIZABETH.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDAVIS-SHARTS, JEAN ELIZABETH.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine the effects of triazolam, a short-acting benzodiazepine, on nocturnal arousals, body movements, and quality of sleep in healthy, postmenopausal females. A double-blind control by constancy cross-over design was employed. Twelve subjects were randomly assigned to the sequence paradigm placebo, drug, placebo, drug or to the sequence paradigm drug, placebo, drug, placebo. Each subject slept for six nights in a sleep laboratory that was specifically designed to decrease the artificiality of the laboratory setting. EEG, EOG, and EMG measurements were recorded on a polysomnograph. Body movements were recorded on videotape and measured by radar and ultrasound instruments. Sleep quality was measured using both Likert and visual analogue scales. In examining arousal activity during sleep period time, the findings demonstrated a significant decrease in wakes after sleep onset (WASO), sleep stage one episodes, and sleep stage shifts when triazolam was compared to a placebo reference. There was no significant effect on K-complex activity associated with movement. In examining body movements during the sleep period time, the findings demonstrated a significant decrease in major body movements when triazolam was compared to a placebo reference. Minor body movements were increased, but not at significant levels. In examining the subject's perceived quality of sleep, their satisfaction with sleep was significantly increased on nights following triazolam administration when compared with nights following placebo administration.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBenzodiazepines.en_US
dc.subjectTranquilizing drugs.en_US
dc.subjectHypnotics.en_US
dc.subjectSleep -- Age factors.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8715712en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698484025en_US
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