Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184106
Title:
PRESCHOOLER UNDERSTANDING OF PRINCIPLES GOVERNING COUNTING.
Author:
ADEY, KYM LLEWELLYN.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation sought to explore dimensions of preschooler conceptual awareness of the principles of counting. The study derived its focus from the research of Rochel Gelman and, in particular, the principles of counting she purports are implicitly understood by young children. Their frequent inability to manifest this awareness in their counting performances is explained as resulting from their susceptibility to task demands. This study explores this position by seeking to facilitate performance in order that conceptual understanding might be more apparent. The sample for this study consisted of 40 children (20 aged 3 years 3 months-3 years 9 months; 20 aged 4 years 3 months-4 years 9 months) selected randomly from a cross section of preschool and day-care centers in Adelaide, South Australia. Phase 1 of the study explored the impact of a procedure which allowed for children to receive both visual and tactile feedback on their counting behavior on array sizes ranging from 2 to 19. The results show conclusively that this self-monitoring technique significantly improved counting performances for both age groups. In doing so it lends support to the Gelman hypothesis that conceptual awareness of the 'how-to' count principles can be masked by task demands. Phase 2 of the study looked at the complex 'order-irrelevance' principle. The results suggest that preschoolers understand that items can be counted in any order before they appreciate that this has no impact on cardinal value. The extreme susceptibility of preschoolers to variations in task demands necessitates further exploration of design and analysis parameters.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Counting.; Number concept in children.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePRESCHOOLER UNDERSTANDING OF PRINCIPLES GOVERNING COUNTING.en_US
dc.creatorADEY, KYM LLEWELLYN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorADEY, KYM LLEWELLYN.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation sought to explore dimensions of preschooler conceptual awareness of the principles of counting. The study derived its focus from the research of Rochel Gelman and, in particular, the principles of counting she purports are implicitly understood by young children. Their frequent inability to manifest this awareness in their counting performances is explained as resulting from their susceptibility to task demands. This study explores this position by seeking to facilitate performance in order that conceptual understanding might be more apparent. The sample for this study consisted of 40 children (20 aged 3 years 3 months-3 years 9 months; 20 aged 4 years 3 months-4 years 9 months) selected randomly from a cross section of preschool and day-care centers in Adelaide, South Australia. Phase 1 of the study explored the impact of a procedure which allowed for children to receive both visual and tactile feedback on their counting behavior on array sizes ranging from 2 to 19. The results show conclusively that this self-monitoring technique significantly improved counting performances for both age groups. In doing so it lends support to the Gelman hypothesis that conceptual awareness of the 'how-to' count principles can be masked by task demands. Phase 2 of the study looked at the complex 'order-irrelevance' principle. The results suggest that preschoolers understand that items can be counted in any order before they appreciate that this has no impact on cardinal value. The extreme susceptibility of preschoolers to variations in task demands necessitates further exploration of design and analysis parameters.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCounting.en_US
dc.subjectNumber concept in children.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8715707en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698477374en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.