THE ADAPTATION OF NEW WORLD MONKEYS TO NEW ENVIRONMENTAL SITUATIONS: FOOD ACQUISITION AND FOOD PROCESSING BEHAVIORS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184076
Title:
THE ADAPTATION OF NEW WORLD MONKEYS TO NEW ENVIRONMENTAL SITUATIONS: FOOD ACQUISITION AND FOOD PROCESSING BEHAVIORS.
Author:
LANDAU, VIRGINIA ILENE.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Food cleaning behavior has been observed among laboratory squirrel monkeys. A Wilcoxon signed-ranks test showed that significantly more cleaning behavior occurred when hard monkey chow pellets and soft fruit were coated with edible debris. Monkeys removed fewer pieces of fruit from a food crock containing fruit coated with edible debris in a timed test. A principal component analysis of the food cleaning behaviors showed two underlying correlated factors. The first factor was the use of the body to clean food. The second factor was the use of the environment to clean food. Two groups of squirrel monkeys, one without previous learners and one with previous learners, were subjects in a fishing study. The presence of previous learners in the social group was not significant for monkeys fishing in water filled crocks. But there was a significant difference in the number of fishing attempts made by the No Previous Learners Group when fishing in wading pools. The Previous Learners group did not make significantly more fishing attempts fishing in wading pools than in crocks. A significant difference was observed in fishing attempts during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the wading pool experiment for both groups. All monkeys in the group fishing experiments ate fish when it could be obtained. Monkeys who did not learn to fish successfully learned alternative behaviors to obtain fish. The Previous Learners group in the wading pool experiment were subjects in a more difficult fishing test. Significantly fewer fishing attempts were made but the number of monkeys that caught fish was larger. Caged squirrel monkeys scored a lower percentage of fishing attempts than squirrel monkeys living in a social group. While Cebus monkeys caught fish, unlike squirrel monkeys, they did not attempt to eat them.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Squirrel monkeys -- Feeding and feeds.; Squirrel monkeys -- Behavior.; Adaptation (Biology); Capuchin monkeys -- Feeding and feeds.; Capuchin monkeys -- Behavior.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
King, J. E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE ADAPTATION OF NEW WORLD MONKEYS TO NEW ENVIRONMENTAL SITUATIONS: FOOD ACQUISITION AND FOOD PROCESSING BEHAVIORS.en_US
dc.creatorLANDAU, VIRGINIA ILENE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLANDAU, VIRGINIA ILENE.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFood cleaning behavior has been observed among laboratory squirrel monkeys. A Wilcoxon signed-ranks test showed that significantly more cleaning behavior occurred when hard monkey chow pellets and soft fruit were coated with edible debris. Monkeys removed fewer pieces of fruit from a food crock containing fruit coated with edible debris in a timed test. A principal component analysis of the food cleaning behaviors showed two underlying correlated factors. The first factor was the use of the body to clean food. The second factor was the use of the environment to clean food. Two groups of squirrel monkeys, one without previous learners and one with previous learners, were subjects in a fishing study. The presence of previous learners in the social group was not significant for monkeys fishing in water filled crocks. But there was a significant difference in the number of fishing attempts made by the No Previous Learners Group when fishing in wading pools. The Previous Learners group did not make significantly more fishing attempts fishing in wading pools than in crocks. A significant difference was observed in fishing attempts during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the wading pool experiment for both groups. All monkeys in the group fishing experiments ate fish when it could be obtained. Monkeys who did not learn to fish successfully learned alternative behaviors to obtain fish. The Previous Learners group in the wading pool experiment were subjects in a more difficult fishing test. Significantly fewer fishing attempts were made but the number of monkeys that caught fish was larger. Caged squirrel monkeys scored a lower percentage of fishing attempts than squirrel monkeys living in a social group. While Cebus monkeys caught fish, unlike squirrel monkeys, they did not attempt to eat them.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSquirrel monkeys -- Feeding and feeds.en_US
dc.subjectSquirrel monkeys -- Behavior.en_US
dc.subjectAdaptation (Biology)en_US
dc.subjectCapuchin monkeys -- Feeding and feeds.en_US
dc.subjectCapuchin monkeys -- Behavior.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKing, J. E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8712890en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698470537en_US
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