DEVELOPMENT OF SPATIAL MEMORY STRATEGIES IN SQUIRREL MONKEYS (COGNITIVE MAP).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184043
Title:
DEVELOPMENT OF SPATIAL MEMORY STRATEGIES IN SQUIRREL MONKEYS (COGNITIVE MAP).
Author:
BAILEY, CATHERINE SUZANNE.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
When different development rates for psychological processes such as those in spatial memory exist, they can be linked to relevant brain areas via their different developmental rates. The hippocampus and caudate nucleus have been implicated in allocentric and egocentric spatial behavior changes found in youth and old age. Variation in allocentric and egocentric behavior in squirrel monkeys due to age was examined using a quadruple T-maze and animals in three age groups: 0.3 - 4 year olds, (n = 12), 5 - 10 year olds (n=12) and 11 - 17 year olds (n = 12). Subjects were trained to go to one of three goals in the maze from one of two training release locations. When they reached criterion for consistent responding, they were given probe trials pseudorandomly interspersed with the training trials in which they were released from one of the three other locations. The 12 test sessions were divided into three phases consisting of four sessions each. A 3 (age groups) x 3 (probe sites) x 3 (phases) mixed design ANOVA with repeated measures on the second and third factors revealed only a significant effect for probe site (F(1,33) = 14.55, p < .01) sing the Geisser-Greenhouse correction for heterogeneity of variance. The pattern of responding most clearly resembled route and was stable over testing. Age was not significant although there was a trend toward random behavior in young and more route-like behavior in older animals. Intrinsic maze cues effects on responding were examined. These data were analyzed using a 3 (age groups) x 2 (training groups) x 3 (probe sites) mixed design ANOVA with repeated measures on the last factor, and again revealed only a significant probe site effect (F(1,33) = 14.55, p < .01). Thus cues intrinsic to the maze did not affect response pattern. Only 13 subjects clearly used one of the three spatial strategies: 6 route, 3 direction, and 4 place. Of the remaining 23 animals 11 were young, 5 were adult and 7 were mature. Two used a variation of place, three used a combination of strategies, four were idiosyncratic, 10 used proto-route (route-like, but not systematic enough to be route) and three were random. The use of place strategy by animals as young as 4 and as old as approximately 17 implicates hippocampal changes occurring outside this age range.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Spatial behavior in animals.; Squirrel monkeys -- Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDEVELOPMENT OF SPATIAL MEMORY STRATEGIES IN SQUIRREL MONKEYS (COGNITIVE MAP).en_US
dc.creatorBAILEY, CATHERINE SUZANNE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBAILEY, CATHERINE SUZANNE.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhen different development rates for psychological processes such as those in spatial memory exist, they can be linked to relevant brain areas via their different developmental rates. The hippocampus and caudate nucleus have been implicated in allocentric and egocentric spatial behavior changes found in youth and old age. Variation in allocentric and egocentric behavior in squirrel monkeys due to age was examined using a quadruple T-maze and animals in three age groups: 0.3 - 4 year olds, (n = 12), 5 - 10 year olds (n=12) and 11 - 17 year olds (n = 12). Subjects were trained to go to one of three goals in the maze from one of two training release locations. When they reached criterion for consistent responding, they were given probe trials pseudorandomly interspersed with the training trials in which they were released from one of the three other locations. The 12 test sessions were divided into three phases consisting of four sessions each. A 3 (age groups) x 3 (probe sites) x 3 (phases) mixed design ANOVA with repeated measures on the second and third factors revealed only a significant effect for probe site (F(1,33) = 14.55, p < .01) sing the Geisser-Greenhouse correction for heterogeneity of variance. The pattern of responding most clearly resembled route and was stable over testing. Age was not significant although there was a trend toward random behavior in young and more route-like behavior in older animals. Intrinsic maze cues effects on responding were examined. These data were analyzed using a 3 (age groups) x 2 (training groups) x 3 (probe sites) mixed design ANOVA with repeated measures on the last factor, and again revealed only a significant probe site effect (F(1,33) = 14.55, p < .01). Thus cues intrinsic to the maze did not affect response pattern. Only 13 subjects clearly used one of the three spatial strategies: 6 route, 3 direction, and 4 place. Of the remaining 23 animals 11 were young, 5 were adult and 7 were mature. Two used a variation of place, three used a combination of strategies, four were idiosyncratic, 10 used proto-route (route-like, but not systematic enough to be route) and three were random. The use of place strategy by animals as young as 4 and as old as approximately 17 implicates hippocampal changes occurring outside this age range.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSpatial behavior in animals.en_US
dc.subjectSquirrel monkeys -- Psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStevens, Josephen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHsiao, Sigmunden_US
dc.identifier.proquest8712859en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698465857en_US
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