A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS OF THREE BACCALAUREATE NURSING PROGRAMS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184028
Title:
A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS OF THREE BACCALAUREATE NURSING PROGRAMS.
Author:
MELVIN, NANCY.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Cost behavior analysis was used to operationalize higher education cost factors in the analysis of instructional costs of three baccalaureate nursing programs in one state university system. Higher education cost factors were conceptualized by Robinson, Ray and Turk (1977) to be three; volume, decision, and environmental. The 30 variables derived from the three factors were the independent variables used in this study to explore their influence on the dependent variables of cost per student credit hour and cost per student contact hour. Several data sources were used, including a questionnaire which elicited program administrator's perceptions of the relative importance of the three factors to their instructional costs. Instructional costs were partitioned into direct and indirect costs. The data were analyzed in three phases to describe the relative influence of the independent variables on instructional costs within programs, among programs, relative to their respective institutions, and to their respective classification of institutions. The findings suggest that volume and decision factors more strongly influence costs than do environmental factors. The mix of volume and decision factors influencing costs differed for the three programs. In general, the most influential volume factors on costs were the number and frequency of course and class offerings. The most influential of the decision variables was student-faculty ratio and faculty rank mix. Higher full-time-equivalent enrollments and higher student credit hour production did not correspond to lower instructional costs, largely because of intervening decision factor variables. All three nursing programs were more costly per student credit hour when indexed to the average instructional expenditures for their respective universities. However, when the nursing program costs were indexed to the average instructional expenditures per full-time-equivalent enrollments of their respective institutional classifications, all three nursing programs were lower than the average. The model of instructional cost analysis used in this modified case study proved to be effective in identifying sources of higher costs within programs and variations among the programs. For student contact hour intensive programs such as nursing, student contact hour, as opposed to the student credit hour is recommended as the more sensitive measure of direct instructional costs.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Nursing -- Study and teaching -- Cost effectiveness.; Nursing schools.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Leslie, Larry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL COSTS OF THREE BACCALAUREATE NURSING PROGRAMS.en_US
dc.creatorMELVIN, NANCY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMELVIN, NANCY.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCost behavior analysis was used to operationalize higher education cost factors in the analysis of instructional costs of three baccalaureate nursing programs in one state university system. Higher education cost factors were conceptualized by Robinson, Ray and Turk (1977) to be three; volume, decision, and environmental. The 30 variables derived from the three factors were the independent variables used in this study to explore their influence on the dependent variables of cost per student credit hour and cost per student contact hour. Several data sources were used, including a questionnaire which elicited program administrator's perceptions of the relative importance of the three factors to their instructional costs. Instructional costs were partitioned into direct and indirect costs. The data were analyzed in three phases to describe the relative influence of the independent variables on instructional costs within programs, among programs, relative to their respective institutions, and to their respective classification of institutions. The findings suggest that volume and decision factors more strongly influence costs than do environmental factors. The mix of volume and decision factors influencing costs differed for the three programs. In general, the most influential volume factors on costs were the number and frequency of course and class offerings. The most influential of the decision variables was student-faculty ratio and faculty rank mix. Higher full-time-equivalent enrollments and higher student credit hour production did not correspond to lower instructional costs, largely because of intervening decision factor variables. All three nursing programs were more costly per student credit hour when indexed to the average instructional expenditures for their respective universities. However, when the nursing program costs were indexed to the average instructional expenditures per full-time-equivalent enrollments of their respective institutional classifications, all three nursing programs were lower than the average. The model of instructional cost analysis used in this modified case study proved to be effective in identifying sources of higher costs within programs and variations among the programs. For student contact hour intensive programs such as nursing, student contact hour, as opposed to the student credit hour is recommended as the more sensitive measure of direct instructional costs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectNursing -- Study and teaching -- Cost effectiveness.en_US
dc.subjectNursing schools.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLeslie, Larryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCord, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPaulsen, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest8711638en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698375942en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.