THE EFFECT OF SCHOOL CONFIGURATION ON LIFE EVENTS AS PERCEIVED STRESSORS OF EARLY ADOLESCENCE.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184021
Title:
THE EFFECT OF SCHOOL CONFIGURATION ON LIFE EVENTS AS PERCEIVED STRESSORS OF EARLY ADOLESCENCE.
Author:
Habkirk, Sue Ann
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to compare the relationship of school configuration, gender, and ethnicity upon the mean number of life events experienced by early adolescents. A review of the literature revealed many existing problems associated with early adolescent and adolescent inability to cope. At the same time, a review of the literature demonstrated an absence of any significant research which determines if school variables contribute to increased student stressful life events. Without empirical data, the improvement of existing programs as well as the development of new or alternative programs aimed at reducing stressful life events, coping with change and encouraging healthier lifestyle choices appears doubtful. Determining specifically what stressful life events early adolescents are experiencing will aid middle level administrators and educators in improving schools to address student needs and maximize learning. The sample consisted of 837 eighth grade students enrolled in nine middle level schools that met the criteria of having been at least one year at a 7-8 school or at least two years at a 6-7-8 school. 529 students were from 7-8 schools and 308 students were from 6-7-8 schools. Total number of males sampled were 395 students and total number of females sampled were 440 students. Subjects were administered a questionnaire composed of 55 life event items previously used with junior high and senior high students and slightly modified in this study for use with early adolescents. Analysis of variance was employed to examine the relationship of the independent variables (school configuration, gender, and ethnicity) on the dependent variable (mean number of life events experienced by early adolescents). The findings revealed significant main effects for: school configuration and life event scores; school configuration and gender. No significant difference was found in the 2-way interaction for school configuration and gender. Significant 3-way interaction was noted for school configuration, ethnicity, and gender. Furthermore, examination of the results using ethnicity as a variable showed no significant difference in main effects or the 2-way interaction of ethnicity and gender or ethnicity and school configuration. Data indicate that significant differences were found in the two school configuration types, gender differences as well as the interaction of school configuration, gender, and ethnicity.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Adolescent psychology.; Stress in youth.; Middle schools.; Junior high school students.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Clark, Donald C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF SCHOOL CONFIGURATION ON LIFE EVENTS AS PERCEIVED STRESSORS OF EARLY ADOLESCENCE.en_US
dc.creatorHabkirk, Sue Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorHabkirk, Sue Annen_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to compare the relationship of school configuration, gender, and ethnicity upon the mean number of life events experienced by early adolescents. A review of the literature revealed many existing problems associated with early adolescent and adolescent inability to cope. At the same time, a review of the literature demonstrated an absence of any significant research which determines if school variables contribute to increased student stressful life events. Without empirical data, the improvement of existing programs as well as the development of new or alternative programs aimed at reducing stressful life events, coping with change and encouraging healthier lifestyle choices appears doubtful. Determining specifically what stressful life events early adolescents are experiencing will aid middle level administrators and educators in improving schools to address student needs and maximize learning. The sample consisted of 837 eighth grade students enrolled in nine middle level schools that met the criteria of having been at least one year at a 7-8 school or at least two years at a 6-7-8 school. 529 students were from 7-8 schools and 308 students were from 6-7-8 schools. Total number of males sampled were 395 students and total number of females sampled were 440 students. Subjects were administered a questionnaire composed of 55 life event items previously used with junior high and senior high students and slightly modified in this study for use with early adolescents. Analysis of variance was employed to examine the relationship of the independent variables (school configuration, gender, and ethnicity) on the dependent variable (mean number of life events experienced by early adolescents). The findings revealed significant main effects for: school configuration and life event scores; school configuration and gender. No significant difference was found in the 2-way interaction for school configuration and gender. Significant 3-way interaction was noted for school configuration, ethnicity, and gender. Furthermore, examination of the results using ethnicity as a variable showed no significant difference in main effects or the 2-way interaction of ethnicity and gender or ethnicity and school configuration. Data indicate that significant differences were found in the two school configuration types, gender differences as well as the interaction of school configuration, gender, and ethnicity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAdolescent psychology.en_US
dc.subjectStress in youth.en_US
dc.subjectMiddle schools.en_US
dc.subjectJunior high school students.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, Paul M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStreittmatter, Janice L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8711631en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698371601en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.