CULTURAL BIAS IN THE CALIFORNIA ACHIEVEMENT TESTS: A FOCUS ON INTERNAL INDICES.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184017
Title:
CULTURAL BIAS IN THE CALIFORNIA ACHIEVEMENT TESTS: A FOCUS ON INTERNAL INDICES.
Author:
COOK, PAUL CHRISTOPHER.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research focused on the cultural bias in the items the California Achievement Tests (CAT). Performance variability was examined across all individual items of the CAT for the third graders from four ethnic groups. A sample of 1600 third grade children was randomly selected from population of children attending various elementary schools in the state of Arizona. Four hundred subjects within each ethnic group were matched for sex, ethnicity, and grade level. A two-factor (items scores and ethnicity) ANOVA procedure was used to examine the interaction between the item performances and ethnicity for groups of Anglo and Black, Hispanic, and American Indian on all individual test items of the eight subtest of the CAT. An examination of obtained findings revealed that a total of 31 items were found to be as culturally biased against Hispanic, Blacks, and Native-American children. Of these items, thirty were biased toward American Indians, six items were biased toward Hispanics, and four items were biased toward Blacks. Some items were biased toward more than one ethnic group. Twenty-eight items identified as biased belonged to five of the six language subtests and three items are part of one of the two mathematics subtests. It should be noted that even though most of the items (98%) did not reveal any statistical evidence of bias, there were only four items (1.9%) on which minority group children performed higher than did the Anglo children. The overall direction of the findings would seem to suggest that most of the content of the CAT is free from cultural bias.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Test bias -- Arizona.; Achievement tests -- Arizona.; California Achievement Tests.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCULTURAL BIAS IN THE CALIFORNIA ACHIEVEMENT TESTS: A FOCUS ON INTERNAL INDICES.en_US
dc.creatorCOOK, PAUL CHRISTOPHER.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCOOK, PAUL CHRISTOPHER.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research focused on the cultural bias in the items the California Achievement Tests (CAT). Performance variability was examined across all individual items of the CAT for the third graders from four ethnic groups. A sample of 1600 third grade children was randomly selected from population of children attending various elementary schools in the state of Arizona. Four hundred subjects within each ethnic group were matched for sex, ethnicity, and grade level. A two-factor (items scores and ethnicity) ANOVA procedure was used to examine the interaction between the item performances and ethnicity for groups of Anglo and Black, Hispanic, and American Indian on all individual test items of the eight subtest of the CAT. An examination of obtained findings revealed that a total of 31 items were found to be as culturally biased against Hispanic, Blacks, and Native-American children. Of these items, thirty were biased toward American Indians, six items were biased toward Hispanics, and four items were biased toward Blacks. Some items were biased toward more than one ethnic group. Twenty-eight items identified as biased belonged to five of the six language subtests and three items are part of one of the two mathematics subtests. It should be noted that even though most of the items (98%) did not reveal any statistical evidence of bias, there were only four items (1.9%) on which minority group children performed higher than did the Anglo children. The overall direction of the findings would seem to suggest that most of the content of the CAT is free from cultural bias.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTest bias -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectAchievement tests -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectCalifornia Achievement Tests.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCalmes, Robert E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGullo, Joseph D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristiansen, Harley D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8711627en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698375769en_US
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