RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RIGHT HEMISPHERE STROKE AND A PASSIVE BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE (DEPRESSION).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184010
Title:
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RIGHT HEMISPHERE STROKE AND A PASSIVE BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE (DEPRESSION).
Author:
WILLIAMS, ANNE MORGAN.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to elucidate the indifferent passive behavior described in persons with right cerebral hemisphere dysfunction (Bear & Fedio, 1977; Critchley, 1966; Denny-Brown, Meyer & Horenstein, 1952). The process of caring for another person encompasses an interpersonal relationship with that person. Passive behavior may interfere with that relationship (Fried, 1970), and therefore jeopardize care. This correlational descriptive study was based on an explanatory model which included hemispheric side of lesion, attention, neglect of extrapersonal hemispace, passive behavior, and mood/emotion. The following indicators of outcome variables were used: attention--bilateral skin conductance level and skin conductance response; neglect--line bisection and cancellation tasks; passive behavior--a modification of Mays' (1973) Activity Passivity Scale; mood/emotion--the anxiety and depression subscales of Kellner and Sheffield's (1973) Symptom Rating Test. The sample comprised 10 persons with a single right hemisphere stroke and 10 persons with a left hemisphere stroke. The strength of the relationships among the variables was assessed only for persons with right hemisphere stroke. The data from this sample support some of the theorized links in the conceptual model, but not others. The predicted positive relationship between right hemisphere stroke and neglect, and the negative relationship between right hemisphere stroke and anxiety were demonstrated (r = .3177 and r = -.4353, respectively). The predicted negative relationship between right hemisphere stroke and attention was not demonstrated. Unexpected significant positive correlations existed between right hemisphere stroke and estimates of attention from the left hand (r = .3111 to r = .4472). No demonstrable relationship existed between right hemisphere stroke and passive behavior. Another unexpected finding was that the scale to scale and part to whole correlations for the concepts mood/emotion and passive behavior were strikingly different for the two groups. The fact that the two groups of subjects did not interpret the contents of the two scales similarly indicated that persons with right hemisphere dysfunction view the world quite differently from those with left hemisphere dysfunction. Appreciation of these differences may allow formulation and implementation of effective care plans which will reduce frustration in both client and caregiver.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cerebrovascular disease.; Cerebral hemispheres.; Human behavior.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Heilman, Kenneth M.
Committee Chair:
Hinshaw, Ada Sue

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RIGHT HEMISPHERE STROKE AND A PASSIVE BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE (DEPRESSION).en_US
dc.creatorWILLIAMS, ANNE MORGAN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWILLIAMS, ANNE MORGAN.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to elucidate the indifferent passive behavior described in persons with right cerebral hemisphere dysfunction (Bear & Fedio, 1977; Critchley, 1966; Denny-Brown, Meyer & Horenstein, 1952). The process of caring for another person encompasses an interpersonal relationship with that person. Passive behavior may interfere with that relationship (Fried, 1970), and therefore jeopardize care. This correlational descriptive study was based on an explanatory model which included hemispheric side of lesion, attention, neglect of extrapersonal hemispace, passive behavior, and mood/emotion. The following indicators of outcome variables were used: attention--bilateral skin conductance level and skin conductance response; neglect--line bisection and cancellation tasks; passive behavior--a modification of Mays' (1973) Activity Passivity Scale; mood/emotion--the anxiety and depression subscales of Kellner and Sheffield's (1973) Symptom Rating Test. The sample comprised 10 persons with a single right hemisphere stroke and 10 persons with a left hemisphere stroke. The strength of the relationships among the variables was assessed only for persons with right hemisphere stroke. The data from this sample support some of the theorized links in the conceptual model, but not others. The predicted positive relationship between right hemisphere stroke and neglect, and the negative relationship between right hemisphere stroke and anxiety were demonstrated (r = .3177 and r = -.4353, respectively). The predicted negative relationship between right hemisphere stroke and attention was not demonstrated. Unexpected significant positive correlations existed between right hemisphere stroke and estimates of attention from the left hand (r = .3111 to r = .4472). No demonstrable relationship existed between right hemisphere stroke and passive behavior. Another unexpected finding was that the scale to scale and part to whole correlations for the concepts mood/emotion and passive behavior were strikingly different for the two groups. The fact that the two groups of subjects did not interpret the contents of the two scales similarly indicated that persons with right hemisphere dysfunction view the world quite differently from those with left hemisphere dysfunction. Appreciation of these differences may allow formulation and implementation of effective care plans which will reduce frustration in both client and caregiver.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCerebrovascular disease.en_US
dc.subjectCerebral hemispheres.en_US
dc.subjectHuman behavior.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHeilman, Kenneth M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairHinshaw, Ada Sueen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMicKinney, Alexander S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8710600en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698372467en_US
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