EASING THE TRANSITION FROM MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION TO HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183987
Title:
EASING THE TRANSITION FROM MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION TO HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION.
Author:
Smith, Vivian Carole
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to empirically investigate the transition from middle level education to high school, focusing on the 8th to 9th grade transition into a four-year high school. The experimental hypotheses were designed to answer the following questions: (1) What are the transitional effects on the early adolescent self-image? (2) What is the impact of age upon transition? (3) What information can be gained relative to intensity and duration of transition effects? (4) How can the information gained be used to ease the transition from middle level education to a four-year high school? The research design included the spring population of students from two 6-8 grade configuration middle level schools (School 1 and School 2) who will attend a 9-12 senior high school in the fall. A questionnaire composed of seven self-image measures was administered two weeks prior to the end of the 1984/85 school year, three days into the 1985/86 school year, and three days prior to the end of the first quarter of the 1985/86 school year. The findings of this study indicate that the null hypotheses are not supported in their entirety by each of the seven dimensions of self-image. Transition effects, as reported by Occasion 1 and Occasion 2 data, yielded an unexpected decrease in perceptions of victimization, and an expected increase in feelings of anonymity. School 1 revealed no visible effects to self-esteem by the transition, with School 2 reporting an increase in self-esteem 3 days into the transition. For impact of age upon transition, this age group of early adolescents (13 or 14 years old) did not report a decrease in self-esteem or an overwhelming feeling of victimization. Transition effects for the 13 or 14 year old were minimal. Analysis of data from the third administration of the POS would indicate the self-esteem of the population was not negatively effected by the transition. Based on this study, there were decreased perceptions of victimization, and increased perceptions of anonymity by 13 or 14 year olds in transition from the 8th to 9th grade.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Clark, Donald C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEASING THE TRANSITION FROM MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION TO HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION.en_US
dc.creatorSmith, Vivian Caroleen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Vivian Caroleen_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to empirically investigate the transition from middle level education to high school, focusing on the 8th to 9th grade transition into a four-year high school. The experimental hypotheses were designed to answer the following questions: (1) What are the transitional effects on the early adolescent self-image? (2) What is the impact of age upon transition? (3) What information can be gained relative to intensity and duration of transition effects? (4) How can the information gained be used to ease the transition from middle level education to a four-year high school? The research design included the spring population of students from two 6-8 grade configuration middle level schools (School 1 and School 2) who will attend a 9-12 senior high school in the fall. A questionnaire composed of seven self-image measures was administered two weeks prior to the end of the 1984/85 school year, three days into the 1985/86 school year, and three days prior to the end of the first quarter of the 1985/86 school year. The findings of this study indicate that the null hypotheses are not supported in their entirety by each of the seven dimensions of self-image. Transition effects, as reported by Occasion 1 and Occasion 2 data, yielded an unexpected decrease in perceptions of victimization, and an expected increase in feelings of anonymity. School 1 revealed no visible effects to self-esteem by the transition, with School 2 reporting an increase in self-esteem 3 days into the transition. For impact of age upon transition, this age group of early adolescents (13 or 14 years old) did not report a decrease in self-esteem or an overwhelming feeling of victimization. Transition effects for the 13 or 14 year old were minimal. Analysis of data from the third administration of the POS would indicate the self-esteem of the population was not negatively effected by the transition. Based on this study, there were decreased perceptions of victimization, and increased perceptions of anonymity by 13 or 14 year olds in transition from the 8th to 9th grade.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllen, Paul M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStreitmatter, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThornburg, Hershelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8708569en_US
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