EFFECTIVENESS OF A CLINICAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR REDUCTION OF PAIN, AND CONCOMITANT SYMPTOMS OF ANXIETY, DEPRESSION, AND HOSTILITY IN INDIVIDUALS EXPERIENCING CHRONIC PAIN (REHABILITATION).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183962
Title:
EFFECTIVENESS OF A CLINICAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR REDUCTION OF PAIN, AND CONCOMITANT SYMPTOMS OF ANXIETY, DEPRESSION, AND HOSTILITY IN INDIVIDUALS EXPERIENCING CHRONIC PAIN (REHABILITATION).
Author:
LINZER, MARC RUBIN.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was designed to determine the effectiveness of a clinical intervention program for reduction of pain and concomitant symptoms of anxiety, depression and hostility in individuals experiencing chronic pain. The program consisted of 36 weeks of supportive group therapy, education and sessions of progressive muscle relaxation induced hypnosis. Single subject research design was used to analyze the clinical effectiveness of treatment. Data was collected and compiled weekly. Serial position curves were generated for a Reported Pain Index, SCL-90-R Symptom Indices for Anxiety, Depression, Hostility and the SCL-90-R Global Severity Index. The three subjects were adults whose ages ranged from 39 to 65, with five or more years of chronic pain due to orthopedic or arthritic conditions. Qualitative analysis of the data indicated dramatic reductions in pain and secondary symptoms. Reductions in reported pain ranged from 17% to 31% with the mean pain reduction for the group of 20.6%. Reduction in the SCL-90-R Global Severity Index ranged from 13.1% to 49.4% with the mean reduction for the group of 36.1%. Reduction in depression ranged from 12.7% to 50% with the mean reduction for the group of 32.6%. Anxiety was reduced for two subjects with a slight increase of .02% for the third subject. Range of anxiety change was .02% increase to 59% reduction with a group mean reduction of 36.3%. Reduction in hostility ranged from 29.5% to 54.4% with a group mean reduction of 39.9%. Progressive muscle relaxation induced hypnosis contributed to further reduction of pain and secondary symptoms with reductions ranging from 4 to 49%. The results of this study show dramatic reductions in pain, depression, hostility and anxiety in chronic pain patients. These findings are not meant to be generalized to other populations, but may point the way for future research utilizing long-term therapeutic approaches and single subject research design.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Intractable pain -- Treatment.; Intractable pain -- Psychological aspects.; Group psychotherapy.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Johnson, Bob

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEFFECTIVENESS OF A CLINICAL INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR REDUCTION OF PAIN, AND CONCOMITANT SYMPTOMS OF ANXIETY, DEPRESSION, AND HOSTILITY IN INDIVIDUALS EXPERIENCING CHRONIC PAIN (REHABILITATION).en_US
dc.creatorLINZER, MARC RUBIN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLINZER, MARC RUBIN.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to determine the effectiveness of a clinical intervention program for reduction of pain and concomitant symptoms of anxiety, depression and hostility in individuals experiencing chronic pain. The program consisted of 36 weeks of supportive group therapy, education and sessions of progressive muscle relaxation induced hypnosis. Single subject research design was used to analyze the clinical effectiveness of treatment. Data was collected and compiled weekly. Serial position curves were generated for a Reported Pain Index, SCL-90-R Symptom Indices for Anxiety, Depression, Hostility and the SCL-90-R Global Severity Index. The three subjects were adults whose ages ranged from 39 to 65, with five or more years of chronic pain due to orthopedic or arthritic conditions. Qualitative analysis of the data indicated dramatic reductions in pain and secondary symptoms. Reductions in reported pain ranged from 17% to 31% with the mean pain reduction for the group of 20.6%. Reduction in the SCL-90-R Global Severity Index ranged from 13.1% to 49.4% with the mean reduction for the group of 36.1%. Reduction in depression ranged from 12.7% to 50% with the mean reduction for the group of 32.6%. Anxiety was reduced for two subjects with a slight increase of .02% for the third subject. Range of anxiety change was .02% increase to 59% reduction with a group mean reduction of 36.3%. Reduction in hostility ranged from 29.5% to 54.4% with a group mean reduction of 39.9%. Progressive muscle relaxation induced hypnosis contributed to further reduction of pain and secondary symptoms with reductions ranging from 4 to 49%. The results of this study show dramatic reductions in pain, depression, hostility and anxiety in chronic pain patients. These findings are not meant to be generalized to other populations, but may point the way for future research utilizing long-term therapeutic approaches and single subject research design.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIntractable pain -- Treatment.en_US
dc.subjectIntractable pain -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectGroup psychotherapy.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Boben_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFisher, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSales, Amosen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8704778en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698205033en_US
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