HERITABILITY OF SALT TOLERANCE DURING GERMINATION AND EMERGENCE IN SHORT STAPLE COTTON (GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM L.).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183961
Title:
HERITABILITY OF SALT TOLERANCE DURING GERMINATION AND EMERGENCE IN SHORT STAPLE COTTON (GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM L.).
Author:
LEDBETTER, CRAIG ALLEN.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Soil salinity is a serious problem for farmers in irrigated agriculture. Soil salts cause reduced stands and yields because of toxic ion and osmotic problems for surviving seedlings. The tolerance to sodium chloride during germination and emergence was studied in three commercial cultivars of short staple cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). It is this stage of the life cycle that cotton is most sensitive to salts in the soil solution. The objectives of this study were to increase the tolerance to sodium chloride during germination and emergence and to determine the narrow sense heritability of this factor. Parental cultivars initially demonstrated 15% emergence at -1.2 MPa NaCl. Surviving salt tolerant plants were planted in the field and seeds from these plants were used as the germplasm for the next cycle of salt tolerance selection. Experiments were conducted to determine the relative salt tolerance of all plants at -1.2, -1.4, -1.6, and -1.8 MPa NaCl. Emergence of salt tolerant accessions from the first cycle of selection ranged from 3.1 to 25.8% in the first relative salt tolerance experiment. The average emergence of all accessions taken over all four salinity levels was 8.9% for first cycle plants. After a second cycle of selection for salt tolerance, the average emergence percentage increased to 13.0% over the four salinity levels. Emergence ranged from 0.7 to 32.6% in the second relative salt tolerance experiment. Narrow sense heritability of sodium chloride tolerance during germination and emergence was estimated at 0.38 using data from the first and second relative salt tolerance experiments.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Plants -- Effect of salt on.; Cotton.; Salt-tolerant crops.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dobrenz, Albert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHERITABILITY OF SALT TOLERANCE DURING GERMINATION AND EMERGENCE IN SHORT STAPLE COTTON (GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM L.).en_US
dc.creatorLEDBETTER, CRAIG ALLEN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLEDBETTER, CRAIG ALLEN.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSoil salinity is a serious problem for farmers in irrigated agriculture. Soil salts cause reduced stands and yields because of toxic ion and osmotic problems for surviving seedlings. The tolerance to sodium chloride during germination and emergence was studied in three commercial cultivars of short staple cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). It is this stage of the life cycle that cotton is most sensitive to salts in the soil solution. The objectives of this study were to increase the tolerance to sodium chloride during germination and emergence and to determine the narrow sense heritability of this factor. Parental cultivars initially demonstrated 15% emergence at -1.2 MPa NaCl. Surviving salt tolerant plants were planted in the field and seeds from these plants were used as the germplasm for the next cycle of salt tolerance selection. Experiments were conducted to determine the relative salt tolerance of all plants at -1.2, -1.4, -1.6, and -1.8 MPa NaCl. Emergence of salt tolerant accessions from the first cycle of selection ranged from 3.1 to 25.8% in the first relative salt tolerance experiment. The average emergence of all accessions taken over all four salinity levels was 8.9% for first cycle plants. After a second cycle of selection for salt tolerance, the average emergence percentage increased to 13.0% over the four salinity levels. Emergence ranged from 0.7 to 32.6% in the second relative salt tolerance experiment. Narrow sense heritability of sodium chloride tolerance during germination and emergence was estimated at 0.38 using data from the first and second relative salt tolerance experiments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPlants -- Effect of salt on.en_US
dc.subjectCotton.en_US
dc.subjectSalt-tolerant crops.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDobrenz, Alberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEndrizzi, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRay, Dennisen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8704777en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698249841en_US
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