THE EMERGENCE OF CHILDREN'S SPATIAL ABILITIES: A QUESTION OF GEOMETRIC PRECISION.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183953
Title:
THE EMERGENCE OF CHILDREN'S SPATIAL ABILITIES: A QUESTION OF GEOMETRIC PRECISION.
Author:
GLIDER, PEGGY.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research investigated the precision with which spatial information can be maintained in memory and reproduced as well as factors which may effect these emerging abilities. To study this, ten males and ten females in each of first, third, fifth, and seventh grades participated in three drawing tasks under two conditions (match and recall). The tasks involved the presentation of a 4" straight line or a 2" x 2" right angle drawn on an 8" white disc. Subjects were asked to draw a line exactly the same size and in the same place (static), after an imagined rotation, or after an imagined bending or unbending of the line (transformation) on an 1" white disc. Several mixed design analyses of variance with repeated measures on the task variables were run. First graders made significantly more errors than all other subjects. Third and fifth graders differed little and both performed significantly less accurately than seventh graders. Performance on the rotation task and the transformation task did not differ significantly with performance on both yielding more error than performance on the static task. The match condition generally proved easier than the recall condition, straight lines led to less error than bent lines, and orientation information was more accurately preserved than metric information. The requirements of the task, i.e., no change, change in position, or a change in form, interacted with both the stimulus type and the type of information preserved. Grade level also interacted significantly with task and stimulus type. When determining how spatial abilities emerge and the accuracy with which spatial information can be dealt, task demands, stimulus characteristics, and type of information being measured must be considered along with the developmental changes.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Space perception in children.; Perceptual-motor learning.; Sex differences (Psychology) in children.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EMERGENCE OF CHILDREN'S SPATIAL ABILITIES: A QUESTION OF GEOMETRIC PRECISION.en_US
dc.creatorGLIDER, PEGGY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGLIDER, PEGGY.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research investigated the precision with which spatial information can be maintained in memory and reproduced as well as factors which may effect these emerging abilities. To study this, ten males and ten females in each of first, third, fifth, and seventh grades participated in three drawing tasks under two conditions (match and recall). The tasks involved the presentation of a 4" straight line or a 2" x 2" right angle drawn on an 8" white disc. Subjects were asked to draw a line exactly the same size and in the same place (static), after an imagined rotation, or after an imagined bending or unbending of the line (transformation) on an 1" white disc. Several mixed design analyses of variance with repeated measures on the task variables were run. First graders made significantly more errors than all other subjects. Third and fifth graders differed little and both performed significantly less accurately than seventh graders. Performance on the rotation task and the transformation task did not differ significantly with performance on both yielding more error than performance on the static task. The match condition generally proved easier than the recall condition, straight lines led to less error than bent lines, and orientation information was more accurately preserved than metric information. The requirements of the task, i.e., no change, change in position, or a change in form, interacted with both the stimulus type and the type of information preserved. Grade level also interacted significantly with task and stimulus type. When determining how spatial abilities emerge and the accuracy with which spatial information can be dealt, task demands, stimulus characteristics, and type of information being measured must be considered along with the developmental changes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSpace perception in children.en_US
dc.subjectPerceptual-motor learning.en_US
dc.subjectSex differences (Psychology) in children.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8704769en_US
dc.identifier.oclc698212457en_US
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