AN EXPANDED CONCEPT OF TIMBRE AND ITS STRUCTURAL SIGNIFICANCE, WITH A TIMBRAL ANALYSIS OF GEORGE CRUMB'S "NIGHT OF THE FOUR MOONS".

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183937
Title:
AN EXPANDED CONCEPT OF TIMBRE AND ITS STRUCTURAL SIGNIFICANCE, WITH A TIMBRAL ANALYSIS OF GEORGE CRUMB'S "NIGHT OF THE FOUR MOONS".
Author:
MCGEE, WILLIAM JAMES.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Timbre is an important aspect of music, particularly in the twentieth century. Relatively little serious work on this subject has been published, however, either from a historical standpoint or from an analytical view. The purpose of this present study was to clarify the nature of timbre and to demonstrate the structural role it can have in music. The development of the timbre concept was traced from as early as the fifteenth century to present. From a very simple idea, timbre evolved into a complex phenomenon involving scientific, acoustical analysis and subjective, perceptual evaluation. It was found that currently timbre is not merely a physical manifestation, but also a function of aesthetic judgment and human response to stimuli. A brief historical survey was made of the importance of timbre in music. It was shown that timbre emerged as a significant musical element, forming the characteristic sound structure of a composition and (by extension) the distinctive sonorous style (Klangstil) of a composer. In developing to this point, the idea of timbre metamorphosed into a particular concept of "sound," a term that includes any sound quality that contributes to the character and structure of a composition. A process of analysis was developed to determine musical sound structure. It was shown that the sound-related aspects of the parameters of pitch, dynamics, time, texture, and timbre can act and interact to construct formal shape through cohesion and differentiation. It was established that the music of George Crumb shows a high regard for sound as a structural element. His Night of the Four Moons was analyzed, demonstrating the process of sound analysis. The analysis also showed that various qualities of sound itself are used as compositional material as well as for cohesion and differentiation. This aurally perceived, characteristic structure formed by or related to the action of sound was termed the "audiogenic image."
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Tone color (Music); Crumb, George. Night of the four moons.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rogers, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAN EXPANDED CONCEPT OF TIMBRE AND ITS STRUCTURAL SIGNIFICANCE, WITH A TIMBRAL ANALYSIS OF GEORGE CRUMB'S "NIGHT OF THE FOUR MOONS".en_US
dc.creatorMCGEE, WILLIAM JAMES.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMCGEE, WILLIAM JAMES.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTimbre is an important aspect of music, particularly in the twentieth century. Relatively little serious work on this subject has been published, however, either from a historical standpoint or from an analytical view. The purpose of this present study was to clarify the nature of timbre and to demonstrate the structural role it can have in music. The development of the timbre concept was traced from as early as the fifteenth century to present. From a very simple idea, timbre evolved into a complex phenomenon involving scientific, acoustical analysis and subjective, perceptual evaluation. It was found that currently timbre is not merely a physical manifestation, but also a function of aesthetic judgment and human response to stimuli. A brief historical survey was made of the importance of timbre in music. It was shown that timbre emerged as a significant musical element, forming the characteristic sound structure of a composition and (by extension) the distinctive sonorous style (Klangstil) of a composer. In developing to this point, the idea of timbre metamorphosed into a particular concept of "sound," a term that includes any sound quality that contributes to the character and structure of a composition. A process of analysis was developed to determine musical sound structure. It was shown that the sound-related aspects of the parameters of pitch, dynamics, time, texture, and timbre can act and interact to construct formal shape through cohesion and differentiation. It was established that the music of George Crumb shows a high regard for sound as a structural element. His Night of the Four Moons was analyzed, demonstrating the process of sound analysis. The analysis also showed that various qualities of sound itself are used as compositional material as well as for cohesion and differentiation. This aurally perceived, characteristic structure formed by or related to the action of sound was termed the "audiogenic image."en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTone color (Music)en_US
dc.subjectCrumb, George. Night of the four moons.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRogers, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217503en_US
dc.identifier.oclc682913741en_US
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