THE PREHISTORY OF SOUTHWESTERN ARIZONA: A REGIONAL RESEARCH DESIGN.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183915
Title:
THE PREHISTORY OF SOUTHWESTERN ARIZONA: A REGIONAL RESEARCH DESIGN.
Author:
MCGUIRE, RANDALL HAULCIE.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
On the broadest level this dissertation makes a methodological statement about the design of regional research in archaeology, especially for Cultural Resource Management. It advocates by example a revised concept and set of requirements for regional research design. This revision views regional research design as something different from project-specific design. Regional research design requires the archaeologist focus on the total research potential of a region, rather than those problems that fascinate an individual. The regional research design resembles an overview in taking this perspective, but differs by providing an archaeological research program. This program specifies how the potential of an area relates to the coordination of research effort between projects, the assessment of archaeological significance and the integration of small projects. At no time is the regional research design a cookbook. It can never realize the unique potential of a specific project, nor specify exact techniques for field work. A regional research design for southwestern Arizona provides the empirical illustration of the revised concept and requirements. As is typical of most CRM research, this area does not equate to either a physiographic or cultural unit but rather results from the Bureau of Land Management and the National Forest Service's division of Arizona into Class I overview units. The core of this research design is a synthesis of the environment, ethnography, and archaeology of the region. This synthesis and an historical consideration of archaeological research in the area provides the basis for identifying the major scientific issues which archaeologists have (or can) addressed in the region. This leads to the development of a research program for southwestern Arizona. The research program specifies a minimal representative data set that all projects in the region should collect.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Arizona -- Antiquities.; Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Antiquities.; Archaeology -- Methodology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE PREHISTORY OF SOUTHWESTERN ARIZONA: A REGIONAL RESEARCH DESIGN.en_US
dc.creatorMCGUIRE, RANDALL HAULCIE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMCGUIRE, RANDALL HAULCIE.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOn the broadest level this dissertation makes a methodological statement about the design of regional research in archaeology, especially for Cultural Resource Management. It advocates by example a revised concept and set of requirements for regional research design. This revision views regional research design as something different from project-specific design. Regional research design requires the archaeologist focus on the total research potential of a region, rather than those problems that fascinate an individual. The regional research design resembles an overview in taking this perspective, but differs by providing an archaeological research program. This program specifies how the potential of an area relates to the coordination of research effort between projects, the assessment of archaeological significance and the integration of small projects. At no time is the regional research design a cookbook. It can never realize the unique potential of a specific project, nor specify exact techniques for field work. A regional research design for southwestern Arizona provides the empirical illustration of the revised concept and requirements. As is typical of most CRM research, this area does not equate to either a physiographic or cultural unit but rather results from the Bureau of Land Management and the National Forest Service's division of Arizona into Class I overview units. The core of this research design is a synthesis of the environment, ethnography, and archaeology of the region. This synthesis and an historical consideration of archaeological research in the area provides the basis for identifying the major scientific issues which archaeologists have (or can) addressed in the region. This leads to the development of a research program for southwestern Arizona. The research program specifies a minimal representative data set that all projects in the region should collect.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectArizona -- Antiquities.en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Arizona -- Antiquities.en_US
dc.subjectArchaeology -- Methodology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217500en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681920542en_US
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