ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN MENTAL RETARDATION OF CHILDREN FROM TWO CULTURES: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSESSMENT.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183912
Title:
ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN MENTAL RETARDATION OF CHILDREN FROM TWO CULTURES: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSESSMENT.
Author:
FOLEY, SARAH VERONICA.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of known etiological factors in mildly mentally handicapped students across minority and nonminority groups and to examine the similarities of these patterns. A comparison of early diagnoses was also made. The total population of all children labeled Educable Mentally Handicapped (EMH) and attending regular elementary schools within one of the largest districts in the southwest served as the sample for the present study. There were 128 children, 64 minorities and 64 nonminorities. The student records were reviewed for data regarding etiological factors, previous diagnoses and early medical factors. A pilot study which involved administering a questionnaire to a sample to twenty-eight social workers was conducted to ascertain the validity of obtained data. Eight specific hypotheses were addressed. A Chi-Square analysis yielded information about the patterns of category similarities (congenital, prenatal, perinatal, postnatal and familial), between two groups as well as the presence of professional diagnosis. A set of five factorial analysis of variance were performed to examine the impact of age, number of symptoms, presence of professional diagnosis and length of hospital stay on IQ scores of children in both groups. A discriminant function analysis was performed to determine the discriminatory power of four variables (IQ, length of hospital stay, number of symptoms and presence of professional diagnosis). The prevalence of perinatal and postnatal symptoms and diagnoses occurred with high frequency for both groups. Congenital factors occurred significantly more for the nonminority group. The findings indicated that there were no significant differences across minority and nonminority groups in terms of intellectual functioning due to the impact of the four previously mentioned variables. Consistent with the ANOVA results, the information obtained from the discriminant function analysis suggests similarity of the two groups in terms of the four variables. The results were discussed in relation to the utility of early etiological information and the importance of such research. The implications of such findings for placement of children in general in these classes or for the children from minority groups in particular, were emphasized.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mental retardation -- Southwest, New -- Cross-cultural studies.; Brain -- Diseases -- Etiology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleETIOLOGICAL FACTORS IN MENTAL RETARDATION OF CHILDREN FROM TWO CULTURES: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSESSMENT.en_US
dc.creatorFOLEY, SARAH VERONICA.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFOLEY, SARAH VERONICA.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of known etiological factors in mildly mentally handicapped students across minority and nonminority groups and to examine the similarities of these patterns. A comparison of early diagnoses was also made. The total population of all children labeled Educable Mentally Handicapped (EMH) and attending regular elementary schools within one of the largest districts in the southwest served as the sample for the present study. There were 128 children, 64 minorities and 64 nonminorities. The student records were reviewed for data regarding etiological factors, previous diagnoses and early medical factors. A pilot study which involved administering a questionnaire to a sample to twenty-eight social workers was conducted to ascertain the validity of obtained data. Eight specific hypotheses were addressed. A Chi-Square analysis yielded information about the patterns of category similarities (congenital, prenatal, perinatal, postnatal and familial), between two groups as well as the presence of professional diagnosis. A set of five factorial analysis of variance were performed to examine the impact of age, number of symptoms, presence of professional diagnosis and length of hospital stay on IQ scores of children in both groups. A discriminant function analysis was performed to determine the discriminatory power of four variables (IQ, length of hospital stay, number of symptoms and presence of professional diagnosis). The prevalence of perinatal and postnatal symptoms and diagnoses occurred with high frequency for both groups. Congenital factors occurred significantly more for the nonminority group. The findings indicated that there were no significant differences across minority and nonminority groups in terms of intellectual functioning due to the impact of the four previously mentioned variables. Consistent with the ANOVA results, the information obtained from the discriminant function analysis suggests similarity of the two groups in terms of the four variables. The results were discussed in relation to the utility of early etiological information and the importance of such research. The implications of such findings for placement of children in general in these classes or for the children from minority groups in particular, were emphasized.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMental retardation -- Southwest, New -- Cross-cultural studies.en_US
dc.subjectBrain -- Diseases -- Etiology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberObrzut, Jacken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFranklin, Melvinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8702341en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697827668en_US
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