PREDICTION OF CLASSROOMS THAT ARE AT RISK: IMPLICATIONS FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT (ARIZONA).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183910
Title:
PREDICTION OF CLASSROOMS THAT ARE AT RISK: IMPLICATIONS FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT (ARIZONA).
Author:
ELLIS-SCHWABE, MICHELLE ANDREE.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was designed to isolate variables that could predict classrooms where there is some risk of low academic achievement. Observations were conducted in 18 second through sixth grade classrooms in Tucson, Arizona. A minimum of three observations were conducted in each classroom for each of two subject areas, reading and mathematics. The California Achievement Test was used as the pre and post outcome measure. Multiple correlation analyses were used to predict classrooms that would be expected to have low academic achievement gains over the course of one year of instruction. These "at-risk" classrooms were identified using variables derived from a model of academic learning time. The results indicated that the best predictors of reading achievement were process variables such as focusing on task and receiving corrective feedback. This was true when both achievement gain and achievement residuals were time variables such as allocated and engaged time. Though further research is necessary, this study suggests that variables associated with a model of academic learning time appear promising as predictors of classrooms that are at-risk. The possibility of early and valid predictions of this kind has obvious implications for staff development programs. Using the data from classroom observations, specific inservice procedures could be used to alleviate the causes of academic risk. Staff development programs targeted to classrooms that are identified as at-risk would also allow more efficient use of scarce inservice dollars.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Classroom management.; Learning, Psychology of.; Teaching.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePREDICTION OF CLASSROOMS THAT ARE AT RISK: IMPLICATIONS FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT (ARIZONA).en_US
dc.creatorELLIS-SCHWABE, MICHELLE ANDREE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorELLIS-SCHWABE, MICHELLE ANDREE.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to isolate variables that could predict classrooms where there is some risk of low academic achievement. Observations were conducted in 18 second through sixth grade classrooms in Tucson, Arizona. A minimum of three observations were conducted in each classroom for each of two subject areas, reading and mathematics. The California Achievement Test was used as the pre and post outcome measure. Multiple correlation analyses were used to predict classrooms that would be expected to have low academic achievement gains over the course of one year of instruction. These "at-risk" classrooms were identified using variables derived from a model of academic learning time. The results indicated that the best predictors of reading achievement were process variables such as focusing on task and receiving corrective feedback. This was true when both achievement gain and achievement residuals were time variables such as allocated and engaged time. Though further research is necessary, this study suggests that variables associated with a model of academic learning time appear promising as predictors of classrooms that are at-risk. The possibility of early and valid predictions of this kind has obvious implications for staff development programs. Using the data from classroom observations, specific inservice procedures could be used to alleviate the causes of academic risk. Staff development programs targeted to classrooms that are identified as at-risk would also allow more efficient use of scarce inservice dollars.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectClassroom management.en_US
dc.subjectLearning, Psychology of.en_US
dc.subjectTeaching.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8702339en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697813528en_US
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