Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183907
Title:
LONELINESS IN WIDOWHOOD: AN EXPLORATORY SURVEY.
Author:
BREWER, MARY MORLAND VINES.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study utilized a questionnaire (n = 161) containing 50 closed-ended and two open-ended questions drawn from an Individual Psychology theoretical base and designed as an exploratory investigation of loneliness in widowhood. Participants were women over the age of 55 who had been widowed more than three years. Loneliness profiles were different when measured using the UCLA short form loneliness scale than when measured using a one-item loneliness self-report question as dependent variables. Results were analyzed using Pearson product-moment correlations, multiple regression, and repeated measures analysis of variance with a .05 significance level considered important. Collectively, the results of this study show the descriptive profile of loneliness in widowhood to have the following pattern. Widows who were lonely were significantly more likely to be youngest born children. Loneliness was significantly related to: depression, fear, anger expression, poor health, low social involvement, low general contact, and high neighbor disclosure. Loneliness was inversely related to happiness, neighbor contact, and child contact and disclosure. The widows were significantly more happy as: "married" women, "children," and "widows." Disclosure was directional, with widows being significantly less willing to disclose: older, younger, and same age. Disclosure was group specific, being significantly more likely to occur to: children, siblings, parents, and neighbors. Using the loneliness self-report measure, loneliness was significantly related to receiving income from work and to having a living parent. Using the UCLA measure, loneliness was unrelated to any of the following independent measures: number of children in family of origin or procreation; educational level or type; income level; income source; length of marriage or widowhood; age; length of time in the same general or specific area; and number of people living with the widow. However, liking choice of living conditions was significantly related to loneliness. When selected independent variables were entered into a multiple regression equation using the UCLA measure as a dependent variable, loss of control and reduced social involvement were significant predictors of loneliness in widowhood. Hypotheses made on the basis of Individual Psychology theory were generally supported, suggesting the appropriateness of this model in future research.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Widows -- Psychological aspects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Newlon, Betty

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLONELINESS IN WIDOWHOOD: AN EXPLORATORY SURVEY.en_US
dc.creatorBREWER, MARY MORLAND VINES.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBREWER, MARY MORLAND VINES.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study utilized a questionnaire (n = 161) containing 50 closed-ended and two open-ended questions drawn from an Individual Psychology theoretical base and designed as an exploratory investigation of loneliness in widowhood. Participants were women over the age of 55 who had been widowed more than three years. Loneliness profiles were different when measured using the UCLA short form loneliness scale than when measured using a one-item loneliness self-report question as dependent variables. Results were analyzed using Pearson product-moment correlations, multiple regression, and repeated measures analysis of variance with a .05 significance level considered important. Collectively, the results of this study show the descriptive profile of loneliness in widowhood to have the following pattern. Widows who were lonely were significantly more likely to be youngest born children. Loneliness was significantly related to: depression, fear, anger expression, poor health, low social involvement, low general contact, and high neighbor disclosure. Loneliness was inversely related to happiness, neighbor contact, and child contact and disclosure. The widows were significantly more happy as: "married" women, "children," and "widows." Disclosure was directional, with widows being significantly less willing to disclose: older, younger, and same age. Disclosure was group specific, being significantly more likely to occur to: children, siblings, parents, and neighbors. Using the loneliness self-report measure, loneliness was significantly related to receiving income from work and to having a living parent. Using the UCLA measure, loneliness was unrelated to any of the following independent measures: number of children in family of origin or procreation; educational level or type; income level; income source; length of marriage or widowhood; age; length of time in the same general or specific area; and number of people living with the widow. However, liking choice of living conditions was significantly related to loneliness. When selected independent variables were entered into a multiple regression equation using the UCLA measure as a dependent variable, loss of control and reduced social involvement were significant predictors of loneliness in widowhood. Hypotheses made on the basis of Individual Psychology theory were generally supported, suggesting the appropriateness of this model in future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWidows -- Psychological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNewlon, Bettyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8702336en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697812578en_US
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