SELF-HELP AS A LEARNED RESPONSE TO CHRONIC ILLNESS EXPERIENCE: A TEST OF FOUR ALTERNATIVE THEORIES (ADAPTATION, HELPLESSNESS, RESOURCEFULNESS).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183879
Title:
SELF-HELP AS A LEARNED RESPONSE TO CHRONIC ILLNESS EXPERIENCE: A TEST OF FOUR ALTERNATIVE THEORIES (ADAPTATION, HELPLESSNESS, RESOURCEFULNESS).
Author:
BRADEN, CARRIE JO GIFFORD.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purposes of this study were: (a) to identify which of four competing theories best accounted for self help as a learned outcome of chronic illness experience, and (b) to generate a Self Help Model that could be used to explicate self help as a learned response to chronic illness. The concepts of severity of chronic illness, intimate dependency reinforcers, self induced dependency reinforcers, cue outcome independence reinforcers, enabling skill, self help and life quality were specified in a causal format that allowed a competitive test of four different theories. The theories tested were instrumental passivity theory, self induced dependency theory, an adaptation of learned helplessness theory and learned resourcefulness theory. The study utilized a causal modeling design to assess a five stage model. A judgment sample of 786 individuals having a diagnosis of arthritis or an arthritis related condition were mailed questionnaires. Two hundred seventy-eight subjects responded, a 36 percent return rate. Seven scales using a visual analogue response format indexed the theoretical concepts. Reliability and validity estimates were conducted to assess psychometric properties of the instruments. Model parameters were estimated using multiple regression statistical techniques. Residual analysis was conducted to estimate violations of the causal model and statistical assumptions. Factors from one theory, the learned resourcefulness theory, emerged as more credible than factors from any single other theory. However, the data did evidence factors from other theories that were significant. Self induced sick role reinforcers and cue outcome independence reinforcers were found to slightly reduce perception of enabling skill (B = -.31 and B = -.12, respectively; R² = .11). Intimate dependency reinforcers and cue outcome independence reinforcers were found to slightly reduce perception of self help (B = -.34 and B = -.24, respectively; R² = .19). These factors helped to identify environmental and intra-person contingencies that led to reduction in self help. The learned resourcefulness factor, enabling skill, demonstrated the mediating skills that worked to enhance self help (B = .44; R² = .29). The Self Help Model generated to explicate self help as a learned response to chronic illness explained 50 percent of the variance in perceived self help. Self help had a direct positive impact on life quality (B = .61; R² = .46). By knowing the factors influencing a patient’s self help response to chronic illness experience, the nurse is better able to plan more effective self help promoting interventions for individuals, or groups of patients. Nurses who promote a self help response in those having a chronic illness could improve their life quality.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chronic diseases -- Psychological aspects.; Self-care, Health.; Health behavior.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Graham, Katherine Young

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSELF-HELP AS A LEARNED RESPONSE TO CHRONIC ILLNESS EXPERIENCE: A TEST OF FOUR ALTERNATIVE THEORIES (ADAPTATION, HELPLESSNESS, RESOURCEFULNESS).en_US
dc.creatorBRADEN, CARRIE JO GIFFORD.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBRADEN, CARRIE JO GIFFORD.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of this study were: (a) to identify which of four competing theories best accounted for self help as a learned outcome of chronic illness experience, and (b) to generate a Self Help Model that could be used to explicate self help as a learned response to chronic illness. The concepts of severity of chronic illness, intimate dependency reinforcers, self induced dependency reinforcers, cue outcome independence reinforcers, enabling skill, self help and life quality were specified in a causal format that allowed a competitive test of four different theories. The theories tested were instrumental passivity theory, self induced dependency theory, an adaptation of learned helplessness theory and learned resourcefulness theory. The study utilized a causal modeling design to assess a five stage model. A judgment sample of 786 individuals having a diagnosis of arthritis or an arthritis related condition were mailed questionnaires. Two hundred seventy-eight subjects responded, a 36 percent return rate. Seven scales using a visual analogue response format indexed the theoretical concepts. Reliability and validity estimates were conducted to assess psychometric properties of the instruments. Model parameters were estimated using multiple regression statistical techniques. Residual analysis was conducted to estimate violations of the causal model and statistical assumptions. Factors from one theory, the learned resourcefulness theory, emerged as more credible than factors from any single other theory. However, the data did evidence factors from other theories that were significant. Self induced sick role reinforcers and cue outcome independence reinforcers were found to slightly reduce perception of enabling skill (B = -.31 and B = -.12, respectively; R² = .11). Intimate dependency reinforcers and cue outcome independence reinforcers were found to slightly reduce perception of self help (B = -.34 and B = -.24, respectively; R² = .19). These factors helped to identify environmental and intra-person contingencies that led to reduction in self help. The learned resourcefulness factor, enabling skill, demonstrated the mediating skills that worked to enhance self help (B = .44; R² = .29). The Self Help Model generated to explicate self help as a learned response to chronic illness explained 50 percent of the variance in perceived self help. Self help had a direct positive impact on life quality (B = .61; R² = .46). By knowing the factors influencing a patient’s self help response to chronic illness experience, the nurse is better able to plan more effective self help promoting interventions for individuals, or groups of patients. Nurses who promote a self help response in those having a chronic illness could improve their life quality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChronic diseases -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectSelf-care, Health.en_US
dc.subjectHealth behavior.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGraham, Katherine Youngen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHamblin, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirshi, Travisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAtwood, Jan R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishel, Merleen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8623869en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697809092en_US
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