SOIL AERATION, HORMONAL RELATIONSHIPS AND GROWTH OF TOMATO (LYCOPERSICON ESCULENTUM MILL.) UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183877
Title:
SOIL AERATION, HORMONAL RELATIONSHIPS AND GROWTH OF TOMATO (LYCOPERSICON ESCULENTUM MILL.) UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS.
Author:
ALMASOUM, AHMED ABDUL RAHMAN.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were grown in a greenhouse in Arizona in order to determine the effect of aeration, flooding, and exogenously applied benzyladenine (BA) on growth and cytokinin production at different growth stages. The structural changes in roots at different soil environments were also studied. Fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots and root exudate were collected at various stages of growth. Results showed that aerated plants significantly outperformed flooded and BA treated plants due to increased root and shoot output. The level of cytokinin in root exudate was higher during the early phase of vegetative growth. At the time of bud formation and anthesis, the level of cytokinin declined. In the vegetative stage, the competition between removed sinks and the rest of the shoot was reduced and, as a result, more cytokinin was believed to come from the roots to the shoots. Besides, additional carbohydrates were available to the roots. Determination of cytokinins in aerated plants showed a significant increase. However, in flooded plants, a smaller amount of cytokinin was detected. This is believed to be due to death of root apices, a major site for cytokinin production. Under experimental conditions, the application of BA to foliage of flooded plants had an adverse effect on growth of roots and shoot of tomato plants. However, a slight increase in cytokinin level was detected. Histological studies showed an increase in air-spaces (aerenchyma) in roots of flooded plants. This acclimation improved survival in inadequately aerated plants that were waterlogged.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Roots (Botany); Soil aeration.; Tomatoes -- Growth.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Oebker, Norman F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSOIL AERATION, HORMONAL RELATIONSHIPS AND GROWTH OF TOMATO (LYCOPERSICON ESCULENTUM MILL.) UNDER DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS.en_US
dc.creatorALMASOUM, AHMED ABDUL RAHMAN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorALMASOUM, AHMED ABDUL RAHMAN.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were grown in a greenhouse in Arizona in order to determine the effect of aeration, flooding, and exogenously applied benzyladenine (BA) on growth and cytokinin production at different growth stages. The structural changes in roots at different soil environments were also studied. Fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots and root exudate were collected at various stages of growth. Results showed that aerated plants significantly outperformed flooded and BA treated plants due to increased root and shoot output. The level of cytokinin in root exudate was higher during the early phase of vegetative growth. At the time of bud formation and anthesis, the level of cytokinin declined. In the vegetative stage, the competition between removed sinks and the rest of the shoot was reduced and, as a result, more cytokinin was believed to come from the roots to the shoots. Besides, additional carbohydrates were available to the roots. Determination of cytokinins in aerated plants showed a significant increase. However, in flooded plants, a smaller amount of cytokinin was detected. This is believed to be due to death of root apices, a major site for cytokinin production. Under experimental conditions, the application of BA to foliage of flooded plants had an adverse effect on growth of roots and shoot of tomato plants. However, a slight increase in cytokinin level was detected. Histological studies showed an increase in air-spaces (aerenchyma) in roots of flooded plants. This acclimation improved survival in inadequately aerated plants that were waterlogged.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRoots (Botany)en_US
dc.subjectSoil aeration.en_US
dc.subjectTomatoes -- Growth.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOebker, Norman F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJensen, Merle H,en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBessey, Paul M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTucker, T. C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDutt, Gordon R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8623866en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697662884en_US
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