AN ANALYSIS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPELLING AND PUNCTUATION IN SELECTED THIRD AND FOURTH GRADE CHILDREN (ORTHOGRAPHY, PAPAGO, O'ODHAM).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183876
Title:
AN ANALYSIS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPELLING AND PUNCTUATION IN SELECTED THIRD AND FOURTH GRADE CHILDREN (ORTHOGRAPHY, PAPAGO, O'ODHAM).
Author:
WILDE, SANDRA JEAN.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study explores various aspects of the spelling and punctuation development of six Tohono O'odham (Papago) children during their third and fourth grade years. The data used, which was collected in a prior study, consisted of 215 texts (13,793 words) written in natural classroom settings as part of the teacher's ongoing writing curriculum. Field notes decribing what the subjects did as they wrote, as well as written interviews, supplemented the texts themselves. A number of specific features were examined to explore the subjects' use of various level of linguistic information about spelling. Those features included: initial letters, vowel phonemes, consonant digraphs, the letters C and G, consonant gemination, bound morphemes, and homophones. Spellings involving permutation (changes in letter order) and the letters E and Y as final markers, as well as those spellings which were real words, were also examined. Finally, differences between spellers, the subjects' use of punctuation and capitalization, and orthography in the classroom context were analyzed. A number of conclusions were drawn from the analysis. The subjects spelled most words conventionally. The more frequently a word appeared in the subjects' writing, the more likely it was to be spelled conventionally. Selected orthographic features varied widely in how conventionally they were spelled, with those which were less predictable or more abstract tending to be more difficult. Almost every spelling feature examined showed growth from third to fourth grade. The invented spellings of particular features tended to reflect understandable, logical processes. Invented spellings which were either real words or permutations of the intended word were common. There were differences between children not only in how conventionally they spelled but in the types of invented spellings they produced. Punctuation was more difficult than spelling for the subjects, and its use varied greatly between subjects. Capitalization was comparable to spelling in how conventionally it was used. Children used a variety of linguistic information and spelling strategies as they wrote. There was evidence that punctuation usage was driven (at least in some cases) by conscious hypotheses about how it works. Children's metalinguistic knowledge about orthography may or may not parallel their use of it.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
English language -- Punctuation.; English language -- Orthography and spelling.; Written communication -- Study and teaching.; Indians of North America -- Education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Elementary Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goodman, Yetta M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAN ANALYSIS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPELLING AND PUNCTUATION IN SELECTED THIRD AND FOURTH GRADE CHILDREN (ORTHOGRAPHY, PAPAGO, O'ODHAM).en_US
dc.creatorWILDE, SANDRA JEAN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWILDE, SANDRA JEAN.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explores various aspects of the spelling and punctuation development of six Tohono O'odham (Papago) children during their third and fourth grade years. The data used, which was collected in a prior study, consisted of 215 texts (13,793 words) written in natural classroom settings as part of the teacher's ongoing writing curriculum. Field notes decribing what the subjects did as they wrote, as well as written interviews, supplemented the texts themselves. A number of specific features were examined to explore the subjects' use of various level of linguistic information about spelling. Those features included: initial letters, vowel phonemes, consonant digraphs, the letters C and G, consonant gemination, bound morphemes, and homophones. Spellings involving permutation (changes in letter order) and the letters E and Y as final markers, as well as those spellings which were real words, were also examined. Finally, differences between spellers, the subjects' use of punctuation and capitalization, and orthography in the classroom context were analyzed. A number of conclusions were drawn from the analysis. The subjects spelled most words conventionally. The more frequently a word appeared in the subjects' writing, the more likely it was to be spelled conventionally. Selected orthographic features varied widely in how conventionally they were spelled, with those which were less predictable or more abstract tending to be more difficult. Almost every spelling feature examined showed growth from third to fourth grade. The invented spellings of particular features tended to reflect understandable, logical processes. Invented spellings which were either real words or permutations of the intended word were common. There were differences between children not only in how conventionally they spelled but in the types of invented spellings they produced. Punctuation was more difficult than spelling for the subjects, and its use varied greatly between subjects. Capitalization was comparable to spelling in how conventionally it was used. Children used a variety of linguistic information and spelling strategies as they wrote. There was evidence that punctuation usage was driven (at least in some cases) by conscious hypotheses about how it works. Children's metalinguistic knowledge about orthography may or may not parallel their use of it.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEnglish language -- Punctuation.en_US
dc.subjectEnglish language -- Orthography and spelling.en_US
dc.subjectWritten communication -- Study and teaching.en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Education.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElementary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Kenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLarson, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDemers, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOehrle, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest8623865en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697535200en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.