FACTORS AFFECTING PARTICLE GROWTH AND RELATED ORGANIC MATTER REMOVAL DURING ALUM COAGULATION (SIZE DISTRIBUTION, TRIHALOMETHANES, HUMIC).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183866
Title:
FACTORS AFFECTING PARTICLE GROWTH AND RELATED ORGANIC MATTER REMOVAL DURING ALUM COAGULATION (SIZE DISTRIBUTION, TRIHALOMETHANES, HUMIC).
Author:
Kuo, Ching-Jey
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Effects of several important source-related and operation-related factors on particle formation and growth as well as potential particle and dissolved organic matter removal by alum coagulation are described. Two representative natural water sources, with low turbidities and high concentrations of dissolved organic matter, and one commercially available crystalline silica, with defined characteristics, were employed to establish initial aquatic particle and dissolved organic matter conditions. Six experimental variables utilized for evaluation include initial pH, initial turbidity, applied pre-ozonation dose, alum dose, flocculation time and sedimentation time. A bench-scale experimental apparatus with capabilities of ozonation, coagulation, sedimentation and membrane filtration was employed to conduct a series of selected experiments. Each factor investigated in this research proves to be able to inpart, individually or collectively, statistically significant effects on particle formation and growth during alum coagulation. While the addition of model particles shows significant enhancement in particle growth, it fails to demonstrate significant improvement in the removal of dissolved organic matter. On the contrary, effects of pH and alum dose on particle formation and growth are accompanied by corresponding effects on the removal of dissolved organic matter. Pre-ozonation of dissolved organic matter renders the dissolved organic matter more hydrophilic by increasing the number of carboxylic acid functional groups. This phenomenon can significantly improve or impede particle growth as well as dissolved organic matter removal during alum coagulation, depending on raw water chemistry and other operational factors. Alum coagulation under all of the conditions investigated in this research is demonstrably more effective in removing aquatic humic susbtances with higher apparent molecular weights and fewer carboxylic acid functional groups, as opposed to those with lower apparent molecular weight and more carboxylic acid functional groups. The predominant removal mechanisms were found to occur at the beginning stage of the coagulation process; that is, the rapid mixing period. The remaining dissolved organic matter and humic substances can form significant amounts of trihalomethanes upon reaction with chlorine.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Water -- Purification -- Organic compounds removal.; Alum.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Amy, Gary L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFACTORS AFFECTING PARTICLE GROWTH AND RELATED ORGANIC MATTER REMOVAL DURING ALUM COAGULATION (SIZE DISTRIBUTION, TRIHALOMETHANES, HUMIC).en_US
dc.creatorKuo, Ching-Jeyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKuo, Ching-Jeyen_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEffects of several important source-related and operation-related factors on particle formation and growth as well as potential particle and dissolved organic matter removal by alum coagulation are described. Two representative natural water sources, with low turbidities and high concentrations of dissolved organic matter, and one commercially available crystalline silica, with defined characteristics, were employed to establish initial aquatic particle and dissolved organic matter conditions. Six experimental variables utilized for evaluation include initial pH, initial turbidity, applied pre-ozonation dose, alum dose, flocculation time and sedimentation time. A bench-scale experimental apparatus with capabilities of ozonation, coagulation, sedimentation and membrane filtration was employed to conduct a series of selected experiments. Each factor investigated in this research proves to be able to inpart, individually or collectively, statistically significant effects on particle formation and growth during alum coagulation. While the addition of model particles shows significant enhancement in particle growth, it fails to demonstrate significant improvement in the removal of dissolved organic matter. On the contrary, effects of pH and alum dose on particle formation and growth are accompanied by corresponding effects on the removal of dissolved organic matter. Pre-ozonation of dissolved organic matter renders the dissolved organic matter more hydrophilic by increasing the number of carboxylic acid functional groups. This phenomenon can significantly improve or impede particle growth as well as dissolved organic matter removal during alum coagulation, depending on raw water chemistry and other operational factors. Alum coagulation under all of the conditions investigated in this research is demonstrably more effective in removing aquatic humic susbtances with higher apparent molecular weights and fewer carboxylic acid functional groups, as opposed to those with lower apparent molecular weight and more carboxylic acid functional groups. The predominant removal mechanisms were found to occur at the beginning stage of the coagulation process; that is, the rapid mixing period. The remaining dissolved organic matter and humic substances can form significant amounts of trihalomethanes upon reaction with chlorine.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWater -- Purification -- Organic compounds removal.en_US
dc.subjectAlum.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAmy, Gary L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBryant, Woodyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKing, Paul H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSierka, Raymond A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberContractor, Dinshaw N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8623855en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697656762en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.