CHARACTERIZATION OF SILICON-ON-INSULATOR STRUCTURES FORMED BY ION IMPLANTATION OF OXYGEN (SILICON, DEFECTS, INSULATOR).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183849
Title:
CHARACTERIZATION OF SILICON-ON-INSULATOR STRUCTURES FORMED BY ION IMPLANTATION OF OXYGEN (SILICON, DEFECTS, INSULATOR).
Author:
WANG, PING.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structures formed in the top region of silicon wafers by ion implantation of oxygen were characterized by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry), OPM (Optical Microscopy), SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy). Specimens taken from these wafers were previously subjected to specific thermal treatment and silicon epitaxial growth. The results of this investigation show that homogeneous, stoichiometric buried SiO₂ layers were formed beneath the silicon wafer surfaces after high-dose oxygen ion implantation (2.0 x 10¹⁸ O⁺/cm², 180 keV/O⁺). No buried SiO₂ layers were observed in the low-dose wafers (1.0 x 10¹⁷ O⁺/cm², 180 keV/O⁺). Solid-phase epitaxial regrowth (SPE) is strongly temperature dependent. The transition from amorphous (caused by ion impact) to crystalline through the SPE process is completed in the high-dose-rate wafers (∼33 μA/cm²), but not in the low-dose-rate wafers (∼17 μA/cm²). Polysilicon layers were formed on both sides of the SiO₂ layer in the low-dose-rate wafers. Evidence shows that both post annealing (>1000°C, 2 hours in N₂) and in-situ annealing (wafer substrate heating at 500°C during oxygen ion implantation) lower the imperfection density of the top surface region of silicon wafers. A silicon epitaxial layer with low levels of crystalline imperfections was able to be grown on these annealed wafers. The results also show that in-situ annealing is more effective than post annealing. The major microdefects in SOI structures observed in this investigation are dislocations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Semiconductor films.; Silicon.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Material Science and Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Demer, Louis J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCHARACTERIZATION OF SILICON-ON-INSULATOR STRUCTURES FORMED BY ION IMPLANTATION OF OXYGEN (SILICON, DEFECTS, INSULATOR).en_US
dc.creatorWANG, PING.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWANG, PING.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSilicon-on-insulator (SOI) structures formed in the top region of silicon wafers by ion implantation of oxygen were characterized by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry), OPM (Optical Microscopy), SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy). Specimens taken from these wafers were previously subjected to specific thermal treatment and silicon epitaxial growth. The results of this investigation show that homogeneous, stoichiometric buried SiO₂ layers were formed beneath the silicon wafer surfaces after high-dose oxygen ion implantation (2.0 x 10¹⁸ O⁺/cm², 180 keV/O⁺). No buried SiO₂ layers were observed in the low-dose wafers (1.0 x 10¹⁷ O⁺/cm², 180 keV/O⁺). Solid-phase epitaxial regrowth (SPE) is strongly temperature dependent. The transition from amorphous (caused by ion impact) to crystalline through the SPE process is completed in the high-dose-rate wafers (∼33 μA/cm²), but not in the low-dose-rate wafers (∼17 μA/cm²). Polysilicon layers were formed on both sides of the SiO₂ layer in the low-dose-rate wafers. Evidence shows that both post annealing (>1000°C, 2 hours in N₂) and in-situ annealing (wafer substrate heating at 500°C during oxygen ion implantation) lower the imperfection density of the top surface region of silicon wafers. A silicon epitaxial layer with low levels of crystalline imperfections was able to be grown on these annealed wafers. The results also show that in-situ annealing is more effective than post annealing. The major microdefects in SOI structures observed in this investigation are dislocations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSemiconductor films.en_US
dc.subjectSilicon.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterial Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDemer, Louis J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSjoreen, Terry P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8623836en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697637662en_US
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