Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183843
Title:
PERCEPTION OF LUNG VOLUME IN NORMAL HUMAN SUBJECTS.
Author:
PLASSMAN, BRENDA LEE.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ability to duplicate an inspired volume level was studied in five healthy males using the psychophysical method of reproduction. Three conditions were evaluated in order to investigate the perceptual cues used for obtaining a specific inspired volume. Conditions were designed to progressively remove cues that might affect the subject's ability to duplicate an inspired lung volume. In each, the subject performed a standard inspiration, spanning from end expiratory position to 35% of inspiratory capacity. Conditions were varied as follows: (1) subjects were instructed to perform both the standard and test (reproduction) inspirations at the same flow rate and beginning at the same lung volume, (2) subjects were instructed to make the flow rate of the test inspiration faster or slower from standard inspiration, and (3) subjects were instructed to begin the test inspiration at a different lung volume than the standard inspirations. The group mean error for all conditions combined for the first day on which each condition was performed was 173 ml, compared to a mean error of 133 ml. Reduction in errors for all conditions from the first to the second day of performance indicates a practice effect. There was no significant difference in errors between conditions. These results indicate the final lung volume, which remained constant for all three conditions, is important for accurate duplication of inspired volume. This finding for learned respiratory movements is comparable to that found by other researchers for skilled limb movements.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Lungs.; Respiration -- Measurement.; Breathing exercises.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bartlett, Neil
Committee Chair:
Lansing, Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePERCEPTION OF LUNG VOLUME IN NORMAL HUMAN SUBJECTS.en_US
dc.creatorPLASSMAN, BRENDA LEE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPLASSMAN, BRENDA LEE.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAbility to duplicate an inspired volume level was studied in five healthy males using the psychophysical method of reproduction. Three conditions were evaluated in order to investigate the perceptual cues used for obtaining a specific inspired volume. Conditions were designed to progressively remove cues that might affect the subject's ability to duplicate an inspired lung volume. In each, the subject performed a standard inspiration, spanning from end expiratory position to 35% of inspiratory capacity. Conditions were varied as follows: (1) subjects were instructed to perform both the standard and test (reproduction) inspirations at the same flow rate and beginning at the same lung volume, (2) subjects were instructed to make the flow rate of the test inspiration faster or slower from standard inspiration, and (3) subjects were instructed to begin the test inspiration at a different lung volume than the standard inspirations. The group mean error for all conditions combined for the first day on which each condition was performed was 173 ml, compared to a mean error of 133 ml. Reduction in errors for all conditions from the first to the second day of performance indicates a practice effect. There was no significant difference in errors between conditions. These results indicate the final lung volume, which remained constant for all three conditions, is important for accurate duplication of inspired volume. This finding for learned respiratory movements is comparable to that found by other researchers for skilled limb movements.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLungs.en_US
dc.subjectRespiration -- Measurement.en_US
dc.subjectBreathing exercises.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBartlett, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.chairLansing, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKing, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConsroe, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoren, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8623831en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697632756en_US
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