THE RELATION OF LEVEL OF EDUCATION AND GENDER TO JOB SATISFACTION.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183842
Title:
THE RELATION OF LEVEL OF EDUCATION AND GENDER TO JOB SATISFACTION.
Author:
MURRAY, ALAN JAMES.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Changing demographic characteristics of the American workforce include increased levels of education and increased numbers of females. In 1979, females became a majority in the workforce and in higher education. Little research has been conducted on the impact of education and gender on job satisfaction since these changes have occurred. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in job satisfaction associated with level of education and gender. The data of the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 were used to answer the research questions: (1) Were there significant differences among education levels when measured by any of three measures of job satisfaction? and (2) Were there significant differences between males and females on any of the three measures of job satisfaction? Three levels of education were used, these were: high school graduate, two year college graduate, and four-year college graduate were the independent variable for education. Since the literature indicated job level, ability, and socioeconomic status could influence job satisfaction, they were included in the analysis as covariates. Multivariate analyses were used to determine whether education, gender or the interaction of these independent variables resulted in significant differences in any of the three measures of job satisfaction. The multivariate analyses indicated that there were significant differences for both level of education and for gender on the job satisfaction variables considered simultaneously. There was no significant interaction between the education and gender variables. Univariate analyses indicated that there were significant differences for both education and gender on the internal job satisfaction measure, but not on the external or overall measures. The Scheffe post hoc test was used to identify which levels of the education variable were responsible for the significant differences found. Two-year college graduates and four-year college graduates were found to be more satisfied with the internal aspects of their jobs than high school graduates. Similarly, males were found to be more satisfied with the internal aspects of their jobs than were females.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Job satisfaction.; Sex differences (Psychology)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Pathology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE RELATION OF LEVEL OF EDUCATION AND GENDER TO JOB SATISFACTION.en_US
dc.creatorMURRAY, ALAN JAMES.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMURRAY, ALAN JAMES.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractChanging demographic characteristics of the American workforce include increased levels of education and increased numbers of females. In 1979, females became a majority in the workforce and in higher education. Little research has been conducted on the impact of education and gender on job satisfaction since these changes have occurred. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in job satisfaction associated with level of education and gender. The data of the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 were used to answer the research questions: (1) Were there significant differences among education levels when measured by any of three measures of job satisfaction? and (2) Were there significant differences between males and females on any of the three measures of job satisfaction? Three levels of education were used, these were: high school graduate, two year college graduate, and four-year college graduate were the independent variable for education. Since the literature indicated job level, ability, and socioeconomic status could influence job satisfaction, they were included in the analysis as covariates. Multivariate analyses were used to determine whether education, gender or the interaction of these independent variables resulted in significant differences in any of the three measures of job satisfaction. The multivariate analyses indicated that there were significant differences for both level of education and for gender on the job satisfaction variables considered simultaneously. There was no significant interaction between the education and gender variables. Univariate analyses indicated that there were significant differences for both education and gender on the internal job satisfaction measure, but not on the external or overall measures. The Scheffe post hoc test was used to identify which levels of the education variable were responsible for the significant differences found. Two-year college graduates and four-year college graduates were found to be more satisfied with the internal aspects of their jobs than high school graduates. Similarly, males were found to be more satisfied with the internal aspects of their jobs than were females.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectJob satisfaction.en_US
dc.subjectSex differences (Psychology)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Pathologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8623830en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697534055en_US
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