THE DEGRADATION AND UTILIZATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY INDIGENOUS SOIL BACTERIA (NAPHTHALENE, FLUORENE, ANTHRACENE, PYRENE).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183810
Title:
THE DEGRADATION AND UTILIZATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY INDIGENOUS SOIL BACTERIA (NAPHTHALENE, FLUORENE, ANTHRACENE, PYRENE).
Author:
STETZENBACH, LINDA DALE ALLEN.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The persistance of industrially derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the subsurface may be significantly affected by the metabolism of soil bacteria. This study was conducted to determine the ability of indigenous soil bacteria to decrease the concentration of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, fluorene, anthracene, and pyrene) and to utilize the compounds as a substrate for growth. Soil cores from petroleum contaminated and non-contaminated sites contained 10⁵ - 10⁷ viable microorganisms per gram dry weight of soil. Gram negative rod-shaped bacteria predominated. Decreases in the concentration of the four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were observed during incubation with bacterial isolates in aqueous suspension by the use of high performance liquid chromatography. Corresponding increases in bacterial numbers indicated utilization of the compounds as a carbon source. Soil samples from the contaminated sites contained greater numbers of bacteria utilizing anthracene and pyrene than soil samples from non-contaminated sites. Degradation rates of the four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were related to the compound, its concentration, and the bacterium. Biodegradation of pyrene was positively correlated with the presence of oxygen. Pyrene was biodegraded by an Acinetobacter sp. under aerobic conditions but not under anaerobic or microaerophilic conditions. Studies with radiolabeled ¹⁴C-anthracene demonstrated utilization of the labeled carbon as a source of carbon by viable bacterial cells in aqueous suspension. Incorporation of ¹⁴C into cellular biomass however was not observed during incubation of ¹⁴C-anthracene in soil.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.; Soil microbiology.; Oil pollution of soils.; Soil pollution.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Microbiology and Immunology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE DEGRADATION AND UTILIZATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY INDIGENOUS SOIL BACTERIA (NAPHTHALENE, FLUORENE, ANTHRACENE, PYRENE).en_US
dc.creatorSTETZENBACH, LINDA DALE ALLEN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSTETZENBACH, LINDA DALE ALLEN.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe persistance of industrially derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the subsurface may be significantly affected by the metabolism of soil bacteria. This study was conducted to determine the ability of indigenous soil bacteria to decrease the concentration of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, fluorene, anthracene, and pyrene) and to utilize the compounds as a substrate for growth. Soil cores from petroleum contaminated and non-contaminated sites contained 10⁵ - 10⁷ viable microorganisms per gram dry weight of soil. Gram negative rod-shaped bacteria predominated. Decreases in the concentration of the four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were observed during incubation with bacterial isolates in aqueous suspension by the use of high performance liquid chromatography. Corresponding increases in bacterial numbers indicated utilization of the compounds as a carbon source. Soil samples from the contaminated sites contained greater numbers of bacteria utilizing anthracene and pyrene than soil samples from non-contaminated sites. Degradation rates of the four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were related to the compound, its concentration, and the bacterium. Biodegradation of pyrene was positively correlated with the presence of oxygen. Pyrene was biodegraded by an Acinetobacter sp. under aerobic conditions but not under anaerobic or microaerophilic conditions. Studies with radiolabeled ¹⁴C-anthracene demonstrated utilization of the labeled carbon as a source of carbon by viable bacterial cells in aqueous suspension. Incorporation of ¹⁴C into cellular biomass however was not observed during incubation of ¹⁴C-anthracene in soil.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.en_US
dc.subjectSoil microbiology.en_US
dc.subjectOil pollution of soils.en_US
dc.subjectSoil pollution.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSinclair, N. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKelley, L. M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClayton, J. W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPepper, I. L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8613839en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697531874en_US
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