Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183729
Title:
Personal Reflection: A Prescription for Medical Education
Author:
Solem, Casey
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2011 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Since the time of the Second World War, patients have taken a more active role in their medical decision-making processes (Thomasma 1983). This has led to an increased expectation of professionalism, empathy, and respect from their physicians. The act of personal reflection by physicians is proposed as a means to help physicians meet these growing expectations from patients. The study of literature throughout the process of medical education has been established as a means to promote this type of personal reflection (Charon 2006). An exploration of the historical elements of this process provides a framework for the role that personal reflection plays in the practice of medicine and in the process of medical education. An analysis of key components of educating future physicians is provided, with an emphasis placed on methodologies that have been previously implemented. A review of personal reflection seminars that have been available in various medical education settings provides an understanding of factors that lead to the success and failure of such curricula, and provides the framework for a set of recommendations, a prescription, which may assist additional medical educators as they produce similar programs. Examples of personal reflection by the author are provided in order to emphasize the salient themes identified by the literature.
MeSH Subjects:
Narration; Self Concept; Writing
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Robert, Jason, PhD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePersonal Reflection: A Prescription for Medical Educationen_US
dc.contributor.authorSolem, Caseyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2011-03-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2011 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractSince the time of the Second World War, patients have taken a more active role in their medical decision-making processes (Thomasma 1983). This has led to an increased expectation of professionalism, empathy, and respect from their physicians. The act of personal reflection by physicians is proposed as a means to help physicians meet these growing expectations from patients. The study of literature throughout the process of medical education has been established as a means to promote this type of personal reflection (Charon 2006). An exploration of the historical elements of this process provides a framework for the role that personal reflection plays in the practice of medicine and in the process of medical education. An analysis of key components of educating future physicians is provided, with an emphasis placed on methodologies that have been previously implemented. A review of personal reflection seminars that have been available in various medical education settings provides an understanding of factors that lead to the success and failure of such curricula, and provides the framework for a set of recommendations, a prescription, which may assist additional medical educators as they produce similar programs. Examples of personal reflection by the author are provided in order to emphasize the salient themes identified by the literature.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshNarrationen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.subject.meshWritingen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorRobert, Jason, PhDen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.