An Objective Methodology to Quantify Motor Skills in Basic Orthopaedic and Gynecologic Surgical Tasks

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183715
Title:
An Objective Methodology to Quantify Motor Skills in Basic Orthopaedic and Gynecologic Surgical Tasks
Author:
Sharer, Sarah Kennedy
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Feb-2011
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2011 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
This study is the initial step in the development of a basic skills simulator for surgical residents, intended to serve as a cross-platform objective motor skills training system. A robust system was developed to measure motor skills of orthopaedic surgeons and gynecologic surgeons. The orthopaedic study focused on three basic skills: drill, tap, and screw insertion. Each of the participants repeated the sequential task of drill, tap, screw insertion ten times in cadaveric femoral diaphyseal bone. The gynecologic study focused on placement of sutures across ten incisions in synthetic skin. Real time wrist, hand, and finger position was recorded bilaterally using Immersion CyberGloves® and the Ascension Liberty Tracker®. Four metrics were evaluated: task duration, gesture proficiency, hand movement smoothness (replaced by subjective rating in Gyn study), and number of errors, in order to differentiate between groups with different skill levels: No Skills, Limited Skills, Advanced Skills, and Expert Skills. The results demonstrated a significant difference between the Expert Skills group and the less skilled groups. In both studies the Expert Skills group completed the tasks the fastest, with the greatest proficiency, smoothness and accuracy. These results establish the 5 capability of our present skill quantification system and will assist in future improvement of the analysis algorithm.
MeSH Subjects:
Surgical Procedures, Operative; Computer Simulation; Motor Skills
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Kahol, Kanav, PhD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn Objective Methodology to Quantify Motor Skills in Basic Orthopaedic and Gynecologic Surgical Tasksen_US
dc.contributor.authorSharer, Sarah Kennedyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2011-02-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2011 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study is the initial step in the development of a basic skills simulator for surgical residents, intended to serve as a cross-platform objective motor skills training system. A robust system was developed to measure motor skills of orthopaedic surgeons and gynecologic surgeons. The orthopaedic study focused on three basic skills: drill, tap, and screw insertion. Each of the participants repeated the sequential task of drill, tap, screw insertion ten times in cadaveric femoral diaphyseal bone. The gynecologic study focused on placement of sutures across ten incisions in synthetic skin. Real time wrist, hand, and finger position was recorded bilaterally using Immersion CyberGloves® and the Ascension Liberty Tracker®. Four metrics were evaluated: task duration, gesture proficiency, hand movement smoothness (replaced by subjective rating in Gyn study), and number of errors, in order to differentiate between groups with different skill levels: No Skills, Limited Skills, Advanced Skills, and Expert Skills. The results demonstrated a significant difference between the Expert Skills group and the less skilled groups. In both studies the Expert Skills group completed the tasks the fastest, with the greatest proficiency, smoothness and accuracy. These results establish the 5 capability of our present skill quantification system and will assist in future improvement of the analysis algorithm.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshSurgical Procedures, Operativeen_US
dc.subject.meshComputer Simulationen_US
dc.subject.meshMotor Skillsen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorKahol, Kanav, PhDen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.