Parental Attitudes Regarding HPV Vaccination of Pre-Adolescent and Adolescent Females in Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/183687
Title:
Parental Attitudes Regarding HPV Vaccination of Pre-Adolescent and Adolescent Females in Arizona
Author:
Morris, Stephanie M.
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2011 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Background – HPV (human papillomavirus) is considered to be the most pervasive sexually transmitted disease among sexually active young adults in the U.S. and is responsible for approximately 90% of cervical cancers worldwide. In 2006, the FDA (Federal Drug Administration) licensed the first HPV vaccine for use in girls aged 9 to 26; however, evidence shows that vaccine uptake rates among adolescent females remains to be low throughout the country. Objective – To assess parental attitudes and beliefs regarding HPV and HPV vaccination of pre-adolescent and adolescent females in order to identify factors that affect intent to vaccinate. Methods – A questionnaire instrument was distributed to parent members of the AZPTA (Arizona Parent-Teacher Association) and the general internet population in Arizona from March 2010 to August 2010. Results – Of the eligible respondents, 61.1% expressed intent to vaccinate their daughter(s) with the HPV vaccine. Approximately 92% of parents who did not intend to vaccinate their daughter(s) had completed some or all of a post-secondary education. Parents who believed that the HPV vaccine promotes earlier sexual debut (33.3% vs. 68.8%), unsafe sexual behavior (40.0% vs. 73.5%) and sexual promiscuity (25.0% vs. 74.0%) showed significantly less intent to vaccinate with the HPV vaccine than parents who did not believe that the HPV vaccine promotes high-risk sexual activity. 75% of parents were aware that HPV causes cervical cancer and is transmitted by sexual contact; however, 75% of parents answered incorrectly to other HPV knowledge questions. Parents who believed that vaccinations, in general, are unsafe universally did not intend to vaccinate with the HPV vaccine. Conclusions – Barriers to HPV vaccination included parental aversion to vaccinations, miseducation or lack of education about human papillomavirus infection, belief that vaccination will encourage risky sexual behavior among teenagers and concerns regarding efficacy and safety of the HPV vaccine. Efforts to educate parents regarding
MeSH Subjects:
Sexually Transmitted Diseases; Parenting; Vaccination
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Taylor, Melanie, MD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleParental Attitudes Regarding HPV Vaccination of Pre-Adolescent and Adolescent Females in Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Stephanie M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2011-03en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2011 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground – HPV (human papillomavirus) is considered to be the most pervasive sexually transmitted disease among sexually active young adults in the U.S. and is responsible for approximately 90% of cervical cancers worldwide. In 2006, the FDA (Federal Drug Administration) licensed the first HPV vaccine for use in girls aged 9 to 26; however, evidence shows that vaccine uptake rates among adolescent females remains to be low throughout the country. Objective – To assess parental attitudes and beliefs regarding HPV and HPV vaccination of pre-adolescent and adolescent females in order to identify factors that affect intent to vaccinate. Methods – A questionnaire instrument was distributed to parent members of the AZPTA (Arizona Parent-Teacher Association) and the general internet population in Arizona from March 2010 to August 2010. Results – Of the eligible respondents, 61.1% expressed intent to vaccinate their daughter(s) with the HPV vaccine. Approximately 92% of parents who did not intend to vaccinate their daughter(s) had completed some or all of a post-secondary education. Parents who believed that the HPV vaccine promotes earlier sexual debut (33.3% vs. 68.8%), unsafe sexual behavior (40.0% vs. 73.5%) and sexual promiscuity (25.0% vs. 74.0%) showed significantly less intent to vaccinate with the HPV vaccine than parents who did not believe that the HPV vaccine promotes high-risk sexual activity. 75% of parents were aware that HPV causes cervical cancer and is transmitted by sexual contact; however, 75% of parents answered incorrectly to other HPV knowledge questions. Parents who believed that vaccinations, in general, are unsafe universally did not intend to vaccinate with the HPV vaccine. Conclusions – Barriers to HPV vaccination included parental aversion to vaccinations, miseducation or lack of education about human papillomavirus infection, belief that vaccination will encourage risky sexual behavior among teenagers and concerns regarding efficacy and safety of the HPV vaccine. Efforts to educate parents regardingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshSexually Transmitted Diseasesen_US
dc.subject.meshParentingen_US
dc.subject.meshVaccinationen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorTaylor, Melanie, MDen_US
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