Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Blood Pressure Control in Ambulatory Care Visits to Physician Offices in the U.S.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/170533
Title:
Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Blood Pressure Control in Ambulatory Care Visits to Physician Offices in the U.S.
Author:
Couch, Christopher
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2011 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Background: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the U.S. Risk factors identified for coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, and kidney disease include uncontrolled blood pressure, diabetes, renal disease, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and tobacco use. The threshold for pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease is ≥130/80 mmHg. It may be of benefit to extend these criteria to individuals who have other cardiovascular disease risk factors and no diagnosis of hypertension. Blood pressure recommendations in this population have largely been unstudied. This study investigates blood pressure control in this non-hypertensive population. Methods: We analyzed 2006 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) data to determine blood pressure control at physician office visits in the U.S. among patients with cardiovascular disease risk factors and no diagnosis of hypertension. Physician office visits with a documented diagnosis of hypertension were excluded from our study. Characteristics of the non-hypertensive population were indentified and were classified by blood pressure above or below 140/90 mmHg. Cardiovascular disease risk factors examined were diabetes, 4 renal disease, hyperlipidemia, obesity, tobacco use, males >55 years, and females >65 years. This population was then divided into two groups, those with blood pressure above or below 130/80 mmHg. Results: We found 22,744 records (77.4% of visits) with no diagnosis of hypertension out of 29,392 total records, with 43.2% of the non-hypertensive population having BP <140/90 mmHg. Males fulfilled criteria for hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) more frequently than females (63.5% vs. 52.3%, P-value <.001). Patients were mostly younger than 65 years. Males >55 years was the most prevalent CVD risk factor, with 79.2% of these with BP ≥130/80 mmHg. Second most prevalent risk factor was tobacco use at 10.1% of non-hypertensive visits, and BP was ≥130/80 mmHg in 63.6% of these visits. Hyperlipidemia in 5.6% of total visits, with BP ≥130/80 mmHg in 60.5%. Obesity was documented in 5.5% of non-hypertensive population, with BP ≥130/80 mmHg in 60.0%. Visits with one risk factor with BP ≥130/80 mmHg were found in 22.8% of our non-hypertensive study population. Conclusions: 56.8 % of those without a diagnosis of hypertension had elevated blood pressure recorded at their physician visit. BP control rate in our non-hypertensive population was 43.2%, surprisingly
MeSH Subjects:
Risk Factors; Hypertension; Office Visits
Description:
A Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
Mentor:
Campos-Outcalt, Douglas, MD, MPA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Blood Pressure Control in Ambulatory Care Visits to Physician Offices in the U.S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCouch, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen_US
dc.date.issued2011-03-
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2011 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the U.S. Risk factors identified for coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, and kidney disease include uncontrolled blood pressure, diabetes, renal disease, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and tobacco use. The threshold for pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease is ≥130/80 mmHg. It may be of benefit to extend these criteria to individuals who have other cardiovascular disease risk factors and no diagnosis of hypertension. Blood pressure recommendations in this population have largely been unstudied. This study investigates blood pressure control in this non-hypertensive population. Methods: We analyzed 2006 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) data to determine blood pressure control at physician office visits in the U.S. among patients with cardiovascular disease risk factors and no diagnosis of hypertension. Physician office visits with a documented diagnosis of hypertension were excluded from our study. Characteristics of the non-hypertensive population were indentified and were classified by blood pressure above or below 140/90 mmHg. Cardiovascular disease risk factors examined were diabetes, 4 renal disease, hyperlipidemia, obesity, tobacco use, males >55 years, and females >65 years. This population was then divided into two groups, those with blood pressure above or below 130/80 mmHg. Results: We found 22,744 records (77.4% of visits) with no diagnosis of hypertension out of 29,392 total records, with 43.2% of the non-hypertensive population having BP <140/90 mmHg. Males fulfilled criteria for hypertension (≥140/90 mmHg) more frequently than females (63.5% vs. 52.3%, P-value <.001). Patients were mostly younger than 65 years. Males >55 years was the most prevalent CVD risk factor, with 79.2% of these with BP ≥130/80 mmHg. Second most prevalent risk factor was tobacco use at 10.1% of non-hypertensive visits, and BP was ≥130/80 mmHg in 63.6% of these visits. Hyperlipidemia in 5.6% of total visits, with BP ≥130/80 mmHg in 60.5%. Obesity was documented in 5.5% of non-hypertensive population, with BP ≥130/80 mmHg in 60.0%. Visits with one risk factor with BP ≥130/80 mmHg were found in 22.8% of our non-hypertensive study population. Conclusions: 56.8 % of those without a diagnosis of hypertension had elevated blood pressure recorded at their physician visit. BP control rate in our non-hypertensive population was 43.2%, surprisinglyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshHypertensionen_US
dc.subject.meshOffice Visitsen_US
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorCampos-Outcalt, Douglas, MD, MPAen_US
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