Three-Dimentional Architecture of the Renal Inner Medulla of the Desert Rodent Dipodomys Merriami: Potential Impact on the Urinary Concentrating Mechanism

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/156916
Title:
Three-Dimentional Architecture of the Renal Inner Medulla of the Desert Rodent Dipodomys Merriami: Potential Impact on the Urinary Concentrating Mechanism
Author:
Issaian, Tadeh
Issue Date:
Dec-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The objective of the following research project was to analyze the methods behind the urinary concentrating mechanism in Dipodomys merriami, Merriam's kangaroo rat. We hypothesize that the inner medulla of Dipodomys merriami contains extreme examples of various architectural features as well as transport properties which enable it to produce concentrated urine at over 6000mOsm/Kg water. The three-dimensional architecture of the vasculature and nephron segments inside the renal inner medulla (IM) was assessed using digital reconstruction from tissue sections. Descending thin limbs (DTLs), ascending thin limbs (ATLs), collecting ducts (CDs), and ascending vasa recta (AVR) were identified with indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies and lectins that recognize segment-specific proteins associated with solute and water transport (AQP1, ClC-K1, and AQP2). Electron microscopy shows close contact between CDs, AVR, and ATLs at adherence areas. The CDs, AVR, and ATLs are sufficiently close together to form discrete interstitial compartments. This architectural arrangement and apparent isolation of these compartments raise questions regarding their function. One possibility is that lateral solute diffusion from ATLs and CDs into AVR could be preferentially restricted to these areas. Interstitial cell architecture, which could increase and define compartmentalization, may further restrict diffusive exchange.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Health Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThree-Dimentional Architecture of the Renal Inner Medulla of the Desert Rodent Dipodomys Merriami: Potential Impact on the Urinary Concentrating Mechanismen_US
dc.creatorIssaian, Tadehen_US
dc.contributor.authorIssaian, Tadehen_US
dc.date.issued2010-12-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of the following research project was to analyze the methods behind the urinary concentrating mechanism in Dipodomys merriami, Merriam's kangaroo rat. We hypothesize that the inner medulla of Dipodomys merriami contains extreme examples of various architectural features as well as transport properties which enable it to produce concentrated urine at over 6000mOsm/Kg water. The three-dimensional architecture of the vasculature and nephron segments inside the renal inner medulla (IM) was assessed using digital reconstruction from tissue sections. Descending thin limbs (DTLs), ascending thin limbs (ATLs), collecting ducts (CDs), and ascending vasa recta (AVR) were identified with indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies and lectins that recognize segment-specific proteins associated with solute and water transport (AQP1, ClC-K1, and AQP2). Electron microscopy shows close contact between CDs, AVR, and ATLs at adherence areas. The CDs, AVR, and ATLs are sufficiently close together to form discrete interstitial compartments. This architectural arrangement and apparent isolation of these compartments raise questions regarding their function. One possibility is that lateral solute diffusion from ATLs and CDs into AVR could be preferentially restricted to these areas. Interstitial cell architecture, which could increase and define compartmentalization, may further restrict diffusive exchange.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHealth Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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