Race, Nation Building, and the Development of National Identity in Twentieth Century Argentina

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/156889
Title:
Race, Nation Building, and the Development of National Identity in Twentieth Century Argentina
Author:
Adams, Alyssa Susan Brideweser
Issue Date:
Dec-2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In my work, I contend that an elite group of intellectuals and officials known as the Generation 1880 led a number of governmental reforms that affected the Argentine self-identity in racialized terms. I argue that Generation 1880 scholars instituted these reforms in order to pursue their own economic interests and maintain social dominance. In the first section of the thesis, I discuss the influences that affected the Generation 1880's construction of their social model. I focus on why Generation 1880 came to define this social model in racialized terms. In the second section of the thesis, I show how social and legal reforms led by Generation 1880 officials enacted the group's racial ideology. Then I examine the way in which these reforms--based upon the elites' racial ideology--effected citizens living in Argentina. Throughout the paper I analyze the way in which Generation 1880's policies affected Argentine self-identity. I maintain that the social pressures exerted by elites, which delineated acceptable from unacceptable social behavior, effected how citizens in Argentina acted. In time, Generation 1880's race-based policies came to define Argentine identity and the traits of the ideal Argentine citizen in racialized terms.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRace, Nation Building, and the Development of National Identity in Twentieth Century Argentinaen_US
dc.creatorAdams, Alyssa Susan Brideweseren_US
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Alyssa Susan Brideweseren_US
dc.date.issued2010-12-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn my work, I contend that an elite group of intellectuals and officials known as the Generation 1880 led a number of governmental reforms that affected the Argentine self-identity in racialized terms. I argue that Generation 1880 scholars instituted these reforms in order to pursue their own economic interests and maintain social dominance. In the first section of the thesis, I discuss the influences that affected the Generation 1880's construction of their social model. I focus on why Generation 1880 came to define this social model in racialized terms. In the second section of the thesis, I show how social and legal reforms led by Generation 1880 officials enacted the group's racial ideology. Then I examine the way in which these reforms--based upon the elites' racial ideology--effected citizens living in Argentina. Throughout the paper I analyze the way in which Generation 1880's policies affected Argentine self-identity. I maintain that the social pressures exerted by elites, which delineated acceptable from unacceptable social behavior, effected how citizens in Argentina acted. In time, Generation 1880's race-based policies came to define Argentine identity and the traits of the ideal Argentine citizen in racialized terms.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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